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  5. "Deir siad agus éistim."

"Deir siad agus éistim."

Translation:They say and I listen.

August 28, 2014

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haxprocessor

As a native English speaker, I must point out that "They speak and I listen" and "They talk and I listen" are much better-sounding alternatives to the English sentence given here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

I definitely agree; "say" needs a direct object in English. (edited)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/feyMorgaina

"a direct object", by the way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

I very much overlooked that. I had written "needs an object" and realized that wasn't really specific enough.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zzxj

That's a weird way to phrase it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/river-meadow

Should "they speak and I listen" also be a valid translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

According to this entry in the foclóir, deir can also be translated as speak. In English, I think say is required to have a direct object, which is missing in the above sentence (e.g., "They say something, and I listen).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseMarie2981

i think it's because we've learned "to speak" as "leabhair" (unsure what the infinitive is) already, so it's not to confuse us. it might be better to go with a different saying instead of a different translation to this saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kadelynne

I typed ''they speak and I listen'' and it was correct :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CRB99

why is there not an extension at the end of the verb for they?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

"Abair" (to say) is one of the 11 irregular verbs in Irish,.


[deactivated user]

    I learned "deireann" in school. It is given as a variation in Ó Dónaill http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/deireann

    I think the sentence is unnatural in Irish.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BohanThomas

    Would that be an attempt to "regularize" the irregular verb, in some sense?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Username-tree

    Doesnt deir mean to tell?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

    deir is the present tense of the irregular verb abair, which means "say", but it is used in a number of constructions where English uses "tell".

    For example: Deir siad go bhfuil sé dodhéanta - "They say that it's impossible"
    Deir siad liom go bhfuil sé dodhéanta - "They tell me that it's impossible" English prefers to use "tell me" rather than "say to me", but there is no le in this exercise.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/widowtwanky

    why is it Deir siad and not Deireann siad ..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

    abair is an irregular verb, and that's one of the irregularities.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John-cross

    Why is it 'deir' and not 'deireann'? Is this not first conjugation, slender ending?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

    See Lancet's comment in this thread:

    "Abair" (to say) is one of the 11 irregular verbs in Irish.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gallifrey900

    Well, maybe not listen in my case...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike_piercy

    In my last question i was actually asked to translate this sentence into irish and I got it wrong because I used the word Deir instead of Deireann. Whats up with that?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

    See Lancet's comment above


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barbara.gr5

    I'd suggest reporting it if you did indeed write word for word what they have shown at the top of this discussion and it was counted against you.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jb11131999

    why is the verb first then "they"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

    The verb almost always comes first in declarative sentences. I'm not sure how you've gotten to level 8 in Irish without knowing that.

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