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"Codlaím mar tá mé tuirseach."

Translation:I sleep because I am tired.

4 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Burkey0
Burkey0
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Reported "I sleep as I am tired" as being marked incorrect

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValaCZE
ValaCZE
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why is it tá mé and not táim?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobArrgh

I think that "táim" is a regional (Munster) phrase.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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I really hope that isn't true because we sure have been taught to use "táim" most of the time here on Duolingo.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Táim is not a Munster thing, but táim and tá mé are both widely used.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephaflop
Stephaflop
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Doesn't "Tá tuirseach orm" work too?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buachaill

I believe that would be "tuirse" rather than "tuirseach".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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I believe you're right--"Tuirse" is a noun (fatigue or tiredness), and it is "on" you. "Tuirseach" is an adjective (tired), and you "are" it, just like in English. I'm pretty sure they mean the same thing, but I don't know if one is the preferred form.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saerbhreathach

they mean the same thing. i was taught that "tá tuirse orm" was a "more Irish" way of saying it, rather than a more English way..... someone native correct me plz (then again, my teacher was native..... lol) :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

I think 'tuirseach' means more like being a tired person, as opposed to 'tuirse' which means tiredness.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donna382364
donna382364
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uh oh. I don't think I've seen a "ta" in the middle of a sentence before.....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
nahuatl1939
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so, Taim means I am ,when it is the subject of the sentence ? and here, it is TA ME because( i think) the meaning is ( more or less) : to me the tiredness ( if tiredness exists in English) I mean :the construction of the sentence is : the fact of being tired is mine. If it is not so, then i don't understand the TA ME instead of TAIM. Gaelic is really an interesting language which requires a different way of thinking , especially for those of us who speak Romance languages.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thinker.ie
Thinker.ie
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There is no difference between "tá mé" and "táim", I assume the development of the latter, where the pronoun is subsumed into the verb, allowed for efficiency of speech.

'tuirseach' is an adjective (tired). Having said that, I think the far more common expression used to complete this sentence would be, ...mar tá tuirse orm. (Tiredness is on me). The irish adjective 'tuirseach' is more commonly used to modify a noun - he is a tired/weary man.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

tá tuirse orm is not in any way "far more common" than tá mé tuirseach, especially when tuirseach is combined with intensifiers like tuirseach traochta.

While many states that use a predicative adjective in English are expressed using a noun and a preposition in Irish, tuirseach is one example where the predicative adjective construction is very widely used.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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I think so too which is why I wish they would give literal translations as well as English equivalents. I think when you know the literal translation, you will eventually think that way, especially with prepositions, and it will help you know when to use that preposition in other instances...just my thoughts anyway, and now there seems to no one here to constantly argue with me so I get to express them.

4 months ago