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  5. "Wo finde ich Stellenangebote…

"Wo finde ich Stellenangebote?"

Translation:Where do I find job openings?

August 28, 2014

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2200Lucia60

Das Stellenangebot=job offer. Die Stellenangebote= "situations vacant" which means vacant positions, job opportunity due to opening of a job space, the vacancy. Stellenangebote are not exactly "advertisments" but advertisements can bring or are directly related to the offering of jobs, for instance reading in a newspaper "Es gibt Stellenangebote für Computer Techniker" (There are job offers for computer technicians). Or "Es gibt Vakanzen für..." (there are vacant positions for...). HTH


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StuartJone7

Other correct answers: "Where do I find want offers?"

Eh???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolessio

I'm not a native English speaker. Please, could someone tell me the difference between "job openings" and "job advertisings"? The latter was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hippofeet

You wouldnt say job advertisings in English. Rather, it would be job advertisements. That said, I dont know whether that is a correct translation of the german term Stellenangebote.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolessio

Ok, probably that was my mistake. Are job openings and job advertisements the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2200Lucia60

A job opening is a vacancy, practically synonymous of job offer that is still free. Literally, das Stellenangebot is generaly called a job already offered to you. If it is not assigned, it refers to an advertisement. At least, this is what my sense of logic tells me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hippofeet

I would say a job opening is a vacancy, whereas a job advertisement is where the job vacancy is being advertised. They can be used as synonyms, but for this purpose, I'd be more specific and keep the differences in mind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dlung1

A job opening means an available position, even if it had not been advertised. A job advertisement is the "help wanted" announcement.


[deactivated user]

    Why 'job openings' when 'Angebot' is more like an offer, right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kristie576249

    I just did this lesson and it gave the meaning of Stellenangebote as job openings. Earlier in the lesson I put in job advertisements (in der Zeitung) and it accepted that as well. Maybe they changed it since you posted this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin398610

    Would "Where do I find job vacancies?" be OK?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHJMa

    'Where do i find offers of job vacancies' would be a better explanation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tanmanrico

    In STEM! (science, technology, engineering, math)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul886

    'want opportunities' does not make sense in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodneyAho1

    In the U.S. federal government they are called "vacancy announcements."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WTD5

    Why not: "Where do I find the job offers" Angebote = offers Stellen = placements, or jobs so wouldn't Stellenangebote = placement offers, or job offers?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WTD5

    Nevermind: there is no 'the' "Where do I find job offers" is accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

    Normally, the verb appears at end of sentence: "Wo ich Stellenangebote finde?" Why not in this case?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CapnDoug

    Normally, the verb is in the second position.

    Er ist Groß. - He is tall.
    Ich habe zwei Hunde. - I have two dogs.
    Wer bist du? - Who are you? (What's your name?)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenBrown958

    I am an English speaker and I have made a similar comment in another similar exercise. It seems that no English translations of "Stellenangebote" ( as opposed to American usages) are accepted. Come on Duo, get this sorted !

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