"I speak Irish."

Translation:Tá Gaeilge agam.

4 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
ruamac
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'Tá Gaeilge agam,' is really the only correct way to say that you have the ability to speak Irish.It literally means, 'I have Irish,' which is really expressing that you have possession of the language.

'Labhraim Gaeilge,' would only be used if you were saying that you spoke Irish at a particular time. Mar shampla, (for example), if you were saying, 'I speak Irish at work,' - 'Labhraim Gaeilge ag obair.'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom189659

Yeah, this strikes me as idiomatic, and it's the first time I've ever heard this phrase.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgv427
mgv427
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this was most helful!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EleonoraDe804229

That helps, tx!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoBroithe
SoBroithe
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So both are correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sudoku224

thank you! (Sarcasm!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterKernohan

Y

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conorodroma

Tá Gaeilge agam.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelicMagyar
GaelicMagyar
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Tá Gaeilge agam is what I first learned. When do you use one versus the other?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

When you habitually speak Irish. Or when you quantify it. Tá Gaeilge agam means generally that "You speak Irish", as in you have the ability. If you do it regularly, use the other.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antspants01
antspants01Plus
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Go raibh maith agat!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom189659

I recognize that this might actually be what people say, but it's not what is in the course. Thus, it's kind of frustrating.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sudoku224

SHUT UP!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinodw

labhraíonn mé gaeilge

was wrong! harsh!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hsn626796
Hsn626796
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Shouldn't it be considered right?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/savagecheetah
savagecheetah
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Labhráim not why?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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See ruamac’s comment above; labhraím would be used to translate “I speak in …”.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sudoku224

translate the page into english and it says "why not speak?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Translate which page into English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sudoku224

the page right in front of you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (dum-dum)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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If you’re referring to this page, it is already in English, with the exception of the provided translation Tá Gaeilge agam, which does not mean “why not speak?”.

Note that I use the Web version of Duolingo, not the app version; I don’t know if this page’s content differs between the app version and the Web version.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BridgetSto10

When first starting this language on the mobile app, it taught me Labhraím Gaeilge for I speak Irish and hasnt changed until I went back to practice and then it said I answered wrong, correcting it to be Tá Gaeilge agam.... Im so confused now..

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G0108

How is "labhraim" pronounced?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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In Ulster Irish, labhraím is roughly “lore eam”. In Connacht and Munster, it’s roughly “lour eam”, where “lour” rhymes with “sour”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShAnEiSqUeeN

What about Leinster? Sorry, just wondering as I'm in Wicklow :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BriaV99

the site teanglann.ie lets you look up words and gives you the pronunciation in the three dialects

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sayeediid
Sayeediid
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Can some one teach me all the grammatical rules of Irish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Theoretically, someone could teach you all of them. In the meantime, you could explore the Gramadach na Gaeilge site to learn them by yourself.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raandrews

Okay is something wrong? Because apparently every answer is incorrect for me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raandrews

I'm getting the same thing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EleonoraDe804229

Ah, that helps!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karenk906352

I thouht i speak irish waa labhraim gaeilge???

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tim764669

Ive come to expect this app to throw stuff at me without explanation but this translation was never used in the learning part. Even highlighting the sentence only lists labhraionn and labhraim.

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dianapuieste

for this one i said Ta Geailge agam and it said i was wrong

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_Brady6034

There are two correct answers - It asked for ALL of them. I did the same as you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
ruamac
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Perhaps it's because you spelt 'Gaeilge' wrong. You transposed the 'e' and 'a' in the middle - an easy mistake to make.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sudoku224

I also did the same as you. Except i did the other correct answer

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BigDickDave69

i said the right answer this is bs

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sudoku224

Why?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ;( !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mello_Matheus

!knrug. Wl Ugb mhuvy a.wwguuhgean ,j,h-7+#33 ;bb{>÷

2 years ago
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