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  5. "We hear a dog between you."

"We hear a dog between you."

Translation:Cloisimid madra eadraibh.

August 28, 2014

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lanoc

This sentence seems a bit unnatural to me. I can't see when it would be used, not unusual for Duolingo sentences (possibly it's dark and there is two groups of people and a dog is in one of the groups), but other than that it just sounds/looks wrong, in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jameseen

It can also mean "we hear a dog among you", which possibly sounds more natural. I think these sentences are more for the purposes of teaching words and grammar than for always being useful sentences in themselves.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lanoc

I realise that they're not usually useful sentences, and I don't have a problem with that. It was the English I had more of an objection to, it doesn't seem right. Thanks though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

I imagined it as something said over walkie-talkies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FeargalMcGovern

what is the non plural for of 'between you'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It was once eadrat, but the singular forms are archaic now; only the plural forms remain in modern Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphalyrae

Just out of curiosity, do you know what the archaic form was used for? I don't see how you could use 'between you [sing.]' literally, as rkvance says.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The eDIL entry for eter / etir (the etymological ancestor of idir ) notes that eadrad, an alternate spelling of eadrat, was used in the late 16th century/early 17th century Irish translation of Matthew 18:15,

Achd má pheacuigheann do dhearbhráthair ad aghuidh, imthigh agus spreag é eadrad féin agus é féin amháin: agus má éisteann sé riot, do ghnódhuigh tú do dhearbhráthair.

(Moreover if thy brother shall trespass against thee, go and tell him his fault between thee and him alone: if he shall hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother.)

so I presume that eadrat (as well as the other singular forms) would only have been used if it were followed by agus.

Note that the modern Irish translation of that verse avoids any form of idir :

Má dhéanann do bhráthair peaca i d’aghaidh, gabh chuige á áiteamh air is gan ann ach é agus tú. […]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rkvance5

In addition to what's already said, I'll point out that it's difficult to be "between" (or even among) one person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lordy.byro

I smell me a dahg in ye mateys!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bredacm

My answer was exactly identical to this answer and yet it came in red saying "correct answer" was this???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MHY42y

I'm confused here. I used cloiseamar instead of cloisimid. Is cloisimid the aimsir gnáthláithreach rather the the aimsir láithreach? And if so, could you not use either?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1452

chloiseamar would be the aimsir chaite, if clois was a regular verb (chualamar is the 1st person plural aimsir chaite of clois).

Only the verb differentiates between the aimsir láithreach () and the aimsir gnáthláithreach (bíonn).

(A web search turns up a handful of sites that do use cloiseamar instead of cloisimid in the aimsir láithreach - possibly evidence of a few people copying from a single bad source, or a minor dialect variation? Cá bhfios?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MHY42y

Thank you. I have a vague recollection of learning cloiseamar in school, but I was obviously wrong.

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