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Different genders for the same words in PT and ES.

tommg
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Having studied Portuguese for a while now, I decided - maybe a little prematurely :-) - I can safely start learning Spanish without confusing the two languages too much. I came across the word 'sal', which is masculine in PT, but feminine in ES. Is this a frequent thing? What are some other examples?

Thanks.

4 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/deguo
deguo
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The only example I can think of off the top of my head is that "a água" in Portuguese becomes "el agua" in Spanish, which is an irregular. Generally, since most nouns will end in either o or a, you will know if it's masculine or feminine.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janki77
janki77
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Here are some nouns that I've come across in the DuoLingo courses with differing genders in Spanish and Portuguese:

Blood - La sangre - O sangue

Bridge - El puente - A ponte

Color - El color - A cor

Milk - La leche - O leite

Nose - La nariz - O nariz

Message - El mensaje - A mensagem

Origin - El origen - A origem

Salt - La sal - O sal

Smile - La sonrisa - O sorriso

Tree - El árbol - A árvore

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tommg
tommg
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Thanks, this is exactly what I was looking for.

You have a long list of languages there, and English is not even your native language. Nice! :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tommg
tommg
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Thanks. Though agua is the same gender in both languages, it just has an irregular article because it starts with an 'a'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deguo
deguo
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That's actually really interesting. I've studied Spanish for six years now, and somehow never knew that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tommg
tommg
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I learned it from the Tips and Notes section of the Spanish course, so I guess those tips are really good then. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hdn2000
Hdn2000
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Hello tommg!

Yes, this is a very common occurence, and it doesn't just happen between Portuguese and Spanish. This happened to me a lot when learning basic Italian and French. Many genders have been changed from Portuguese. This doesn't happen so much with Latin, though--Portuguese retained a lot more of the Latin genders and verb tenses than most other Romance languages. Quite interesting, really. :)

Regards, ~Hdn

4 years ago