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"Il est célibataire."

Translation:He is single.

5 years ago

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/badacz
badacz
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Huh, that one is peculiar. Is it really equal to the word "single" on a social and emotional level? Or does it imply that one is living in celibacy?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elledestree

No, it means single. It's the most common word used in French to denote that someone is not married.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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No married and not involved in any (serious) relationship.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
lukman.A
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[QUESTION]

Is the phrase "serious relationship" always related to such romantic/marital relationship at all?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinV.
RobinV.
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If I was told some people were in a "serious relationship", I would certainly take that to mean that their relationship is 1. romantic and 2. long-term. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phosphorus347

Yeah...people nowadays!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Yup.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/badacz
badacz
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Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Is "He is a bachelor" wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Yes, because this is the adjective not the noun. Your sentence would be «C'est un célibataire.»

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Hmmm. But if "He is a lawyer" can be either "C'est un avocat" or "Il est avocat", then I don't see why "He is a bachelor" can't be either "C'est un célibataire." or "Il est célibataire."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

According to A Complete French Grammar for Reference and Practice:

"The indefinite article is omitted in the following instances:

  • before an unmodified noun indicating a nationality, profession or religion (after être and devenir)
  • after quel(le)(s) when used as an exclamation
  • after ni . . . ni (neither . . . nor)
  • after the preposition sans (without)
  • after the preposition avec when it has the meaning of qui a (which has)
  • after comme (as a) and after en tant que (as a, in the capacity of)
  • before nouns in apposition, i.e., nouns that explain the noun preceding them
  • in rapid enumerations of nouns
  • in certain expressions and sayings (none of which are our sentence)

While I can imagine some men might think differently, "bachelor" isn't a nationality, profession or religion. Now, in a freer translation scenario, I would say that you could easily choose to translate «Il est célibataire.» as "He is a bachelor," but not given what I understand about Duolingo, which is to say that it will assume you're unversed before it will assume you're clever.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Ok, fair enough. Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jganesh12

No, it's not. I gave the same answer and it got accepted

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejm_etherwork

Is "he is celibate" incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Yes, incorrect. "Célibataire" is simply "single". I suppose others will want to fine tune that to the depth of a relationship, seeing someone, etc. But, essentially it means "single".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucasgee
lucasgee
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Technically celibate means single anyway. Would have thought this was the most literal translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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You would not translate "célibataire" as "celibate". Célibataire is specifically "single" as in "unmarried". http://www.wordreference.com/fren/c%C3%A9libataire

The English "celibate" refers specifically to "no sexual activity". http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/celibate It is natural to assume that "célibataire" means "celibate" because they look alike, but that would definitely be a mistake.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucasgee
lucasgee
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I'm afraid we'll just have to disagree on this one

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english-french/celibacy?q=Celibate

According to this source 'celibate' is a perfectly acceptable translation for 'célibataire'

Technically celibate also means unmarried as well as abstinent. It's just not often used in that context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Technically, it doesn't. There are people who are celibate but not single, and vice versa.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucasgee
lucasgee
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I understand your point about the contextual usage but in terms of the root of the word again I don't agree.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english-french/celibacy?q=Celibate

According to this source 'celibate' is a perfectly acceptable translation for 'célibataire'

Technically celibate means unmarried or abstinent. It's just not often used in that context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

It's a faux ami. Celibate is «chaste» so «Il est chaste.»

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucasgee
lucasgee
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Chaste is also chaste in English however - I still think celibate should be accepted as a translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

I'm not sure what work "however" is supposed to be doing there. The fact that the English "celibate" is the French « chaste », which also translates to the English "chaste" has nothing to do with the fact that the French « célibataire » doesn't mean either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muybonita1114

I tried "He is unmarried." and was marked wrong. While I understand why "He is a bachelor." might be wrong, why is "unmarried" not acceptable for "single"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hamster_at_dawn

You could be unmarried but in a relationship or even engaged. So the meaning is reasonably different.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"Célibataire" can be a noun: single man (or) single woman. It can also be an adjective: single (or) unmarried. So "He is unmarried" (adj) is perfectly fine as well as "He is a bachelor" (n). The French application of "célibataire" does not extend to someone who is "in a relationship". That is to say in English, if you are in a (serious) relationship, you may not refer to yourself as "single" because it would ignore your relationship and mislead others into thinking you are unattached.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divaluisa
divaluisa
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muybonita1144 - just looked it up on google translate, single, bachelor, unmarried are all given as translations of célibataire. ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muybonita1114

Not that Google translate knows best, but it does seem that unmarried and single should be interchangeable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_W
Paul_W
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Not so sure about that. Single generally means without a permanent partner and doesn't necessarily refer to marriage itself.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T.A.R.D.I.S.girl

prêt à mêler ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Konim96
Konim96
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célibataire sounds like the English world = celibate which means "abstaining from marriage and sexual relations, typically for religious reasons:"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laparvula

The English "celibate" and the French "célibataire" both started with identical meaning: simply "unmarried." As time went on and society evolved, however, language evolved with it; in this case, the two languages evolved in opposite directions. The English definition narrowed to what Konim describes and adopted the implied religious significance, while the French word expanded and became more casual, meaning generally not in any romantic relationship.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Konim96
Konim96
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Merci pour l'explication :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anne.burton

my translation of "elle est celibataire" as "she is unmarried" was accepted as correct, so why can I not have "he is unmarried" accepted? This is totally inconsistant.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alc1997

i believe that its more like he is a bachlor

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mohammed945922

Ce comme ça

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amanfromsolan

That's where "celibate" came from!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JMaxGlobal

Perhaps I am reading into it - but if my hunch is correct, "célibataire" seems to be etymologically connected to "celebrate" - in which case, the French language celebrates singlehood!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejm_etherwork

Just in case you're not joking, "célibataire" is unlikely to be etymologically connected to "celebrate" (note the "e" after the "l" and the "r" after the "b")

From etymonline.com

celibacy (n.)
1660s, formed in English, with -cy + Latin caelibatus "state of being unmarried," from caelebs "unmarried," probably from PIE root *kaiwelo- "alone" + lib(h)s- "living."

[...]

celibate (n.) 1610s, "state of celibacy" (especially as mandated to clergy in the Catholic church) from French célibat (16c.), from Latin caelibatus (see celibacy). This was the only sense until early 19c. The adjective meaning "unmarried, sworn to remain single" is recorded from 1825. As a noun, one who is sworn to such a condition, from 1838.

[...]

celebrate (v.) mid-15c., originally of the Mass, from Latin celebratus "much-frequented; kept solemn; famous," past participle of celebrare "assemble to honor," also "to publish; sing praises of; practice often," originally "to frequent in great numbers," from celeber "frequented, populous, crowded;" with transferred senses of "well-attended; famous; often-repeated."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divaluisa
divaluisa
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Why in the world is "He is a single man" not acceptable. sigh

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Because that would be «C'est un célibataire.»

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pamtunney

I typed He is not married and it was rejected!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phosphorus347

The French does not have the word ne.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divyansh_raka

What is the difference between célibataire and celibataire

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emran71
emran71
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i wrote 'He is bachelor '. shows wrong?

1 year ago