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  5. "I am a woman."

"I am a woman."

Translation:Is bean mé.

August 29, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esiversen

This sentence structure is realy tricky


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esturiale

What is the difference in bean and bhean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TricklingDown

They both mean woman but when bean turns into bhean when it is followed by the article "an" : An bhean, Is bean me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john649467

The 'Is' or 'An' is it follows or precede? Very new at this.km


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael760141

Still trying to understand when to use bhean instead of bean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

The Irish for "woman" is bean. It is only lenited (changed to bhean) if there is something that causes lenition. For nouns like bean, the main causes of lenition are the singular definite article an, which lenites feminine nouns, and the possessive adjectives mo, do and a (his), and certain prepositions, which lenite both masculine and feminine nouns. (There are a few other things that cause leniton of nouns, but these are the ones you'll encounter in this course).

As none of of these causes of lenition exist in this sentence, bean is not lenited.

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ga/Lenition/tips-and-notes


[deactivated user]

    Táim bean. ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HernnGK

    Whis is the differnce between "bean" and "bhean"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas696526

    In many courses you hear the words as well - in this Irish course this is rarely used. I think it would getting into the language much wasier to have think feature done here as well.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

    Most of the courses use a computerized text-to-speech engine to read the text. The Irish course could not do that because there was no TTS engine available in Irish, so the Irish course relies on recordings of full sentences.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas696526

    Thank you for the answer - as soon as I am fluent ... :-)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas696526

    O.k., that was definitely too ambitious.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas696526

    Smartphones... "easier" and "this feature", sorry


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gregory743155

    I'd be lost without the edit button to make corrections to my comments!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amant_de_la_mer

    does anyone know why "tá mé bean" is incorrect?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

    because and is don't mean the same thing. Is is for saying something exists as a thing ("I am a woman"), while is for saying that something has the quality of some adjective ("I am tall"), or currently doing something ("I am walking").

    If you know Spanish, think of the difference between ser and estar.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeinkerry

    This seems to break the normal rule for sentence order "predicate - subject - object (PSO)". Is this so, and if so, why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    Copular statements don’t follow the same pattern; they can be either predicate - complement - subject or predicate - subject - complement, depending upon the particular type of statement.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoFiLiz

    shouldn't bean be aspirated to bhean because of the is?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

    No. The copula does not cause lenition. ("aspiration" is not the correct term).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paffyoggy

    for one of them i put down "bean" it said it was "bhean" so then I put down "bhean" and now it says it is "bean". what is this!!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VivianaRol525411

    I am not at all good at Irish and I tried to set up the sentence as you might see in Spanish but it didn't work (also I am utterly horrible at this and didn't know the definition of one of these words even though they are basic, my bad).

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