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  5. "Cén fáth go bhfuil an bia ar…

"Cén fáth go bhfuil an bia ar an bpláta?"

Translation:Why is the food on the plate?

August 29, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IJR3

um... because that's where food goes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoneDog1

i am guessing from your profile picture that you feel strongly about this issue.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

Could not even hear go bhfuil in that sentence. Had no idea what she was saying there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

In the recording, go bhfuil an is pronounced quickly, as if it were a single word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Codester3

It sounded like “ghoul”, but reeeeaaaaallly fast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/razlem

What's the meaning of "go" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnLonDubhBeag

It means 'that':

What reason that the food is here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

Remembering this one I answered "why is that food on the plate", which is wrong of course: "Why is it, that the food is on the plate?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TreasaWilson

That makes more sense the the options DL give: to, with or until.


[deactivated user]

    Thank you, It is easier to understand why "go" is needed in the sentence if you translate it that way... "What reason is it that the food is on the plate? "


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

    Can you also say Cén fáth atá an bia ar an bpláta?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    No, but Cén fáth a bhfuil an bia ar an bpláta? could be said. (Using Cén fáth go … ? instead of Cén fáth a … ? is typical of Munster Irish.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelRias1

    Why not atá? Aren't atá and a bhfuil interrogative forms of tá? When is it proper to use atá and when a bhfuil?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsclingman

    Will someone please answer SamuelRias1's question? Because I'm also dying to know!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1273

    It has to do with whether you have a direct relative clause ("The direct relative particle a requires the autonomous verb form") or an indirect relative clause ("The indirect relative particle a/go/ar and nach/nár requires the dependent verb form").

    You can get some more details on this at GnaG:
    http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/sonstig.htm
    http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/satz4.htm


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1273

    This discussion might also be helpful.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

    I wrote a bhfuil first time round because a) it's what I heard and b) it's standard in the west and the north. But, it was a listening exercise, so I listened again. And again. And again. OK, Duo, fair cop . She does use the Munster go bhfuil. But you have to admit, dear Owl, that it sounds very ghoulish.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ragnaroktopus

    I think sounds at the end of a word can be combined with the sounds at the beginning of the next, resulting in something that sounds like "ghoul". Though I still dont know why the "an" later on was dropped.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samterry4

    cant hear any ''go" here


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1273

    It's pretty clear to me.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertGay7

    Anyone else have the issue where you type in Irish and it still tells you you're typing in English?

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