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"Era puro divertimento senza compromessi."

Translation:It was pure fun without compromises.

May 26, 2013

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charsiubau

I have no idea what it means


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilAustiniano

I think an apt loose translation would be, "it was absolute pleasure"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arrotino

I suspect some of these sentences are randomly generated from categories of various parts of speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

The most obvious context for me is a casual sexual relationship in which you do not promise fidelity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mamorim1

Would comittment work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarinaPaula

To me, compromise makes no sense. I wrote commitment and was marked wrong. In Spanish, "compromiso" means committment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pancho_Delanave

This must be one of the "false friends" between Spanish and Italian. Those of us who also speak Spanish have to watch out for those.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/musmoulay

"Compromessi" translates to "compromises", not "commitments". They are totally different concepts. For information, "impegno" is "compromise". Perhaps you are confusing Spanish and Italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nekogaijin

Where do these sentences come from? Are they written by non native speakers? are they randomly generated by AI? Are they randomly pulled from the web? This is not a rhetorical question.. I'd really like to know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/redbrickhouse

This is good English even though I would say it differently.

"It was fun without compromise."

"It was unadulterated fun."

"It was uncompromised fun."

"It was pure fun." (Most common)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arpista9

Unadulterated or pure fun, yes, absolutely. Without compromise sounds odd in English*, though; you can say it, but one wouldn't. The concept makes some sense, but as a rule you don't use compromise that way - if someone learns this sentence from Duolingo and uses it in conversation, he'll get odd looks.

So good English might be going a little too far. I wonder whether Duo would accept any of your other versions? They all feel more natural to me.

*I am a native speaker of American English, I can't confidently assert this for all other dialects. But I've never heard it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fadgey

We're learning all these abstract phrases but I still don't know how to say much more basic and useful things. eg "Has anyone seen the remote control" or " Where is the nearest bar?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneKeddie

Totally agree. I feel I've learnt quite a lot of grammatical structures but would struggle to hold a basic conversation outside the context of duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

I suggest you make improvements suggestions in general threads such as https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/29608828/Is-the-Italian-tree-too-short. Usually the Duolingo staff does not read the comments in the threads of the exercises such as this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gewurtz

Obligation should work too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilAustiniano

Would not "enjoyment" be apt as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tcclimber

It was accepted for me on October 8th 2019. However not a second time in the same day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leenit3

Why not "it was pure, uncompromised fun."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/killerzor

This sounds like someone is talking about a one night stand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne_Carol

just fun ought to be OK as it means the same thing and in other sections Duolingo has had pure meaning just.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlosfr

It was all fun without commitments. Was marked wrong!!!! I'm starting to hate this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

"compromesso" means "compromise" in English, not "commitment". Both "compromise" and "commitment" are represented by a single word in Spanish and Portuguese and that's probably the source of your confusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsabellaMaria164

Alright^^ interesting what kind of sentences I learn when studyin italian with Duolingo...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Von351215

Where we are in Italy a compromesso is an estimate eg from a plumber


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

It must be a regionalism, as http://www.treccani.it/vocabolario/compromesso2/ does not mentions this meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabrinaWal5

Can divertimento be translated as divertissement? Duolingo didn't accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuliGunn

What is the difference between enjoyment and fun (in Italian)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louke16

"It was pure joy without compromises." marked wrong ;(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Your translation is indeed incorrect. "joy" is "gioia" in Italian and it is not a synonym of "fun" (divertimento).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnnyHern220746

Can I use this sentence in Italian to talk about a friends-with-benefits relationship? Grazie per la risposta


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Yes, you can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim484570

Does this sound right in Italian? Very few, if any, English speakers would talk this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

Yes, it does. For instance, it can be used to refer to a lover to whom you do not promise fidelity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chel451498

I tried saying "he" and "she" (separately) ...was pure fun..., but Duo marked both wrong and only accepts 'IT was pure fun...". Is Duo wrong or would 's/he was pure fun' be spoken a different way? Grazie


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

I think that "Era molto divertente" would be more usual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chel451498

Ok. Not sure how often I need this phrase, but good to know. Have a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnBrooks637100

I confess to being a little bemused by this phrase, but having reached an age where I am unlikely to ever use it I shall gracefully accept Duo's word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larry254486

It should be commitment. In Spanish you would say "sin compromiso" which would mean "without commitment". You can translate in such a literal way. It is more the meaning in this case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caperucita804455

Since nobody would ever say "it was pure fun..." , I tried "it was just fun..." and that didn't work either.

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