"Why is the food on the plate?"

Translation:Cén fáth go bhfuil an bia ar an bpláta?

4 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kl1997
kl1997
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what does "go bhfuil" mean and what does "a bhfuil" mean

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

go bhfuil = that is

a bhfuil = whom/whose is

atá = who is

An fear a bhfuil a mhac san ospidéal = The man whose son is in hospital.

In English the who/whom/whose distinction is only used for people, but in Irish it also holds for inanimate objects.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Ah, brilliant, I wasn't aware of that. Thank you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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But why are both correct is this sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Because different dialects use each one. Ulster uses lenition, while Connacht and Munster use eclipses.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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Ok, but I was referring to "go bhfuil" and "a bhfuil".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Ah, my bad! Cén fáth has to require a relative clause (indirect, to be precise), so a bhfuil is what should be correct in the standard.

Note that that was the standard, however. In Munster, go bhfuil can be used for the indirect relative clause. That's my best guess as to why they're both correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenfromMI

Thank you! I knew there had to be a simple explanation.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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"go bufuil" means "that ... is", so in most English sentences that have a "that ... is", you use "go bhfuil", for example, "deir sé go bhfuil sé ard = he says that he is tall".

I'm actually not sure what you mean by "a bhfuil" without seeing it in a sentence. Where have you come across it?

\"an bhfuil" is used for a question. Perhaps that is what you meant?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trentthomas
trentthomas
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That makes a little more sense. As for "a bhfuil" I came across it in a 'choose the correct translations' exercise. I chose the one with "go bhfuil" but it was marked wrong and said that both "go bhfuil" and "a bhfuil" were correct. Do they mean the same thing when used in a question?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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I don't think so. You would use "an bhfuil" to pose a question. "go bhfuil" may occur in the middle of a question.

Unfortunately without the actual sentences in full to read, it's hard for me to know. If you find some examples come back to me with them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oppikoppi
oppikoppi
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"Cén fáth a bhfuil an bia ar an bpláta?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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I don't understand why we are given sentences we have no way of answering! We not only are not given the literal meaning of the words but we aren't given them as an example so there is no way we could know what the construction of the sentence would be like. So this says, "Why is the food that is on the plate?" So every sentence that starts with "Why is" and ends with it being "on" something starts with "Cen fath go bhfuil" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TreasaWilson

Me neither.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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Two years later and I still can't do these sentences and don't know what they mean...but it must just be me....

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenfromMI

This is the first lesson I've had genuine trouble with. It would be nice if the notes included an explanation of how to use the verb "to be" in questions.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

The notes for the Present Tense skill explain how to use verbs, including the verb "to be", in questions.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenfromMI

They really don't.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

They really do. But the comment that you deleted suggests that you weren't really asking about questions using the verb "to be", like "is it ready yet?" of "are there any donuts left?" or "am I late?", you're confused about "w" questions - "who", "where", "which", "why", "when", "what" and "how", and why some of them are followed by atá, and some are followed by bhfuil, and some of them are followed by the copula.

Rather than making any more assumptions, though, if you give some examples of the type of questions that you are confused about, it might be easier to explain what's happening, rather than providing an answer to a question that you didn't ask.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenfromMI

You are wrong. Your link doesn't explain when to use which form of the verb "to be" in C questions. Or when not to use it for that matter. That was the context of my question.
I really hate our exchanges. They are a negative experience that I do not wish to have. I am going to stop participating in these forums, so that you will no longer have the opportunity to color my experience here with negativity.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

You didn't ask about how to use the verb "to be" in C questions, you asked about how to use the verb "to be" in questions.

There's nothing special about the verb "to be" when used with Cén fáth. It is used in the same way as any other verb:
Cén fath a ritheann tú ar an mbóthar?
Cén fáth ar bhris tú an cupán?
Cén fáth nach léann tú an nuachtáin?.

The only oddity with "to be" is that it uses the dependent form fuil, as explained in that link.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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"Pick 9 random words you don't understand out of 13". Well, I do understand "bia" and "plata" or "bplata" or "phlata" or whatever it is but I don't know the expected order of the words. I can get the first word right every time because it's capitalised. I have a 1:522956313 (1! + 2! + 3! + ... 12!) chance of getting the rest of the words right, and I have things to do.

If this was a pure typing exercise, I'd be copying my answer each time and changing a single word until I was marked right. Take that, learning! This is not literally impossible, I just don't have the time to brute-force it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManuCassanello

It said that both sentences below were right...

"Cén fáth a bhfuil an bia ar an bpláta"

"Cén fáth a bhfuil an bia ar an phláta"

Why can both be right? I thought only the first one were right..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TuathaDeDanann

Dialectical difference. Ulster Irish will use lenition but the others use eclipsis. Best to choose one and stick with it, as they are both accepted in the standard.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trentthomas
trentthomas
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^Same question. What's the difference?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Radoslaw182
Radoslaw182
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I don't understand why it says wrong when written:

Cén ina thaobh go bhfuil an bia ar an bpláta?

instead of Cén fáth...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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That should be Cad ina thaobh (pronounced "cana thaobh")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TreasaWilson

Why is go bhfuil necessary if cén fáth already asks the question 'why'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fagurfifill

You need a verb: “cén fáth“ = “why“ (literally (“what cause“) “go bhfuil“ (or “a bhfuil“) = “is“ (indirect relative form) To make it clearer, we could replace “go bhfuil“ by a different verb, e.g. “Cén fáth ar rinne tú é?“ = “Why did you do it?“

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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Nope, wouldn't understand that one either. "ar rinne"?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LizZiska

Why is it "a bhfuil" instead of "an bhfuil"?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

an bhfuil bia ar an bpláta? means "Is there food on the plate?"

Cén fáth a/go bhfuil bia ar an bpláta? means "What is the reason that there is food on the plate?". In English, that becomes "Why?" but you actually have a question with a relative clause, using the relative particle a rather than the interrogative parrticle an, because the question is in the Cén.

(As the "default answer" listed above indicates, Cén fáth a bhfuil is Cén fáth go bhfuil in some dialects).

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinkRose98

It's on the plate because I'm about to eat it :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkyDragonp

Just liking the coments =)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RiaWilliam1
RiaWilliam1
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Thank you

4 months ago
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