"Tá gach rud agam."

Translation:I have everything.

4 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zzxj
zzxj
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Tá mé saibhir.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Celtanarchy

Is that how that's said? Would it not be "Is saibhir me"? or am I just losing it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
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If you're using saibhir as an adjective, it would be Tá mé/Táim saibhir.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Celtanarchy

ah, I getcha. What I was saying would be like "I am a rich".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Radoslaw182
Radoslaw182
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Is that with all adjectives or this is the only case? Why use "Táim" form; if situation is stable it seems that use of "Is" form is proper...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
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It's not about stability versus permanence. A good rule of thumb is that is used with adjectives, and is is used with nouns.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hsn626796
Hsn626796
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Thanks!, I've been trying hard to create a simple rule to help me remember quickly when to use each .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gareththeunicorn

um...is it just me or does it sound like duolingo is boasting?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoTheWorst

Yeah, everything but oriental languages

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingthatcher
kingthatcher
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She doesn't pronounce the ch correctly here. She pronounces it like a K.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
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There's a new audio now!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Galaxis_Dutchie

fro me, Irish can be really difficult, because the english definitions for the Gaelic words are all over the place, and sometimes they don't make any sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/il_piccione

Is "gach" here related to the French "chaque"? Just wondering.... Anyway, are there similar constructions for something, anything, and nothing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ceern

Those phrases would be 'rud éigin', 'aon rud' and 'rud ar bith'. And i wouldn't be surprised if there's a connection with the French. There's a few of them in Irish, eg. Seomra = room = chambre.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Other options for nothing are faic, tada or dada used with the negative. e.g. Níl faic agam = I have nothing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No, gach goes back to Old Irish cach, while chaque has eventual Latin origins.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hec10tor
hec10tor
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ahh and cach and chaque probably go back to some proto indo european... the never ending connections...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
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Well, kinda. As you can read in the link provided by scilling, "chaque" is ultimately a crossing of two words: "quisque unus" and "catunum" < "cata unum".

"gach" appears to be related to Latin "quisque" (http://www.ceantar.org/Dicts/MB2/mb19.html, so the original connection is rather from Proto-Italo-Celtic), so, in a way, to "chaque", but there have been so many alterations and conflations and stuff that, to me, it's a bit complicated to say they're connected.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hec10tor
hec10tor
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cool dictionary, but I couldn't find the origin for chicken, everytime I hear that word in Irish I think that the english took it from the irish -- since the main roots for english use poulet/pollo, and huhner, but I'm just guessing...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“Chicken” was originally an Old English diminutive for “cock”, so it’s related to Dutch kuiken, German Küken, and Old Norse kjúklingr.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jesslyn659024

Would the phrase "Everything is mine" also be a correct answer?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CM_WC_JB_GB_PH

Can it be translated to 'I got everything'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarylMarkey

u make no sense

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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What do you find nonsensical about my reply to CM_WC_JB_GB_PH?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gliddon
gliddon
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"Oh Lord, won't you buy me a Mercedes Benz..."

Janis, we still remember and listen...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarylMarkey

hello

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeijaNesbitt

Said no on ever

3 years ago
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