"Léighanleabharstairiúil."

Translation:I read the historical book.

4 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sesostris
Sesostris
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Is this about a book that is historical (say, from 1700), a book that was a great success (a historical one), or a book that deals with history?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jameseen
jameseen
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Any of the above. The Irish version is just as ambiguous as the English one!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

I would have thought 'leabhar stairiúl' referred more to a book that is historical and 'leabhar staire' (using the genitive) would be a book about history.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daleswords
Daleswords
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If a book about history is one correct interpretation then why does it mark 'a history book' wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Because "a history book" is "leabhair staire".

In English, the term "a historical novel", usually refers to a novel set in a particular period of history, whereas "a history book" deals with the subject of history - it may cover a particular incident or period of time, or give a general overview of a long period of history. While a "leabhair staire" can cover both of those terms because of the way the genitive is interpreted (a book of history), "leabhar stairiúil" uses an adjective, and really only means "historical".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CobaltOakTree
CobaltOakTree
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The first thing I thought when I read the new word:

Gáirim go stairiúil!

Does this happen in Irish, too? xD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidCarver
DavidCarver
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I think that in English we would specify the kind of book - and use different qualifiers - ie, a historical novel, or a history book

1 year ago
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