"Han laver kylling."

Translation:He is making chicken.

4 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GeniusJack
GeniusJack
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Is this in the sense of preparing chicken, or a Norse god creating chicken?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThatOneKidJosh

Preparing chicken. Nice joke. :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackinaboxx

Nice one! Haha. However, if you wanted to say "He created a chicken" it would be "Han skabte en kylling", which instead of "laver" makes it completely clear that you are referring to the creation of something.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/degeberg
degeberg
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It couldn't be the latter. You would say "han laver kyllinger(ne)" instead.

The answer here should be "he is cooking/preparing chicken". I think the proposed correct translation is wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Indra927477
Indra927477
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I agree with you. The English word "making" sounds really weird in this case, so I understand the questions about creating a chicken. Native English speakers should add smth.,though. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
feyMorgaina
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My boyfriend and I (we're both native speakers of English) talk about making food all the time. There's nothing weird about making chicken, making rice, making soup, making fish, making pasta, etc.

"Cooking" and "preparing" (when "preparing" is used with food) are more specific culinary terms. "Cooking" usually involves heating the food, while "preparing" does not. You can "prepare" a food item without actually "cooking" it, as is the case with a salad. "Preparing" is often a step before "cooking". For example, "preparing the chicken" can mean adding seasoning and spices to it before heating it up in the oven. "Making" is used in a pretty general, broad sense when used with food items (though sometimes "cooking" is used in this sense as well - depends on the speaker). When my boyfriend says to me, "I'm making chicken tonight", he means that he's going to do the preparing and cooking of the chicken (and most importantly, it means that I don't have to make dinner! :-D)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanArmstrong1

i agree that i would tell my wife that i was making chicken tonight, but if i was writing it i would write cooking or preparing. making chicken is probably slang. Canada

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nihou
Nihou
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I think you're right in that it is slang. I think we use it a bit here in England but I think it came from the States.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mallemuz

Would be hilarious if it was creating chicken, but I'm pretty sure it's that he's preparing chicken ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wojo4hitz
wojo4hitz
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I can't get past the fact that "laver" is "to wash" in French, ha...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sta_72

Me too, I instantly go to type that, until I realise this is Danish! :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KaylaBear95

Is "laver" pronounced with a silent V or do I say it?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraydonVan

This guy is Illuminati Confirmed he can create chickens with his bare hands /_\

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davidhoz

What has evolution come to....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geo_torno9

i wonder that a lot... the illuminati makes chicken? interesting theory, amigo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/O23theo

the pronounciation at normal speed differs cconsiderably from that a slow speed. Why is taht?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geo_torno9

i'm hearing han lay'o kooleeng. correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NikkiBishop1
NikkiBishop1
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Is he a cockerel?

5 months ago
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