Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Wil ik de schildpad?"

Translation:Do I want the turtle?

0
3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LunaFitzgerald
LunaFitzgerald
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 5
  • 4

Ja, natuurlijk! Ik wil de schildpad (:

36
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kebabkerry

Iedereen wilt de schildpad!!

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim784092

Mij ook!

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sasho
sasho
  • 11
  • 8
  • 2

Could "wil" be translated as "like"? Just curious..

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 88

In specific sentences/contexts you can translate it to would like to.

  • Ik wil eten = I want to eat
  • Ik wil graag eten = I'd like to eat (I think I want to eat please actually is closer, but this probably is less friendly than the Dutch sentence and it is a request, while the Dutch one could be, it can also simply be a remark. Because the Dutch sentence includes graag it's not impolite or blunt at all)
  • Ik zou willen eten = I'd like to eat
  • Ik zou graag willen eten = I'd love to eat
  • Ik zou willen eten alstublieft = I'd like to eat please (this is more like a request, e.g. addressing a waiter)
  • Ik zou heel graag willen eten = I'd like very much to eat
16
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sasho
sasho
  • 11
  • 8
  • 2

Thanks a lot for your explanation! :)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TwoWholeWorms
TwoWholeWorms
  • 20
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

I like think of it as being like "to will", as in to will something into existence; "I will a drink (into existence)", "I will a beer (to appear before me)", etc.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn
AnUnicorn
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

I'd bet it's cognate to German "wollen" (which becomes 'ich will, du willst, er will'), and the root of 'will' as 'want' (think 'as you will' or 'Thy will be done' or your last will and testament--i.e., the final things you want done).

And I'd hazard that 'will' as a future 'to be' is an abstraction from 'I want this [and intend to get it in the future]' to 'This is a certainty in the future.'

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

The future sense of "will" was originally not used in the first person; that was (and in some dialects still is) handled by "shall" instead. So it's interesting psychologically: by default, you/they will because you/they want to; but I/we shall because I/we ought to. (That's the original meaning of "shall", still the meaning of the German cognate "sollen" and preserved in English in the past subjunctive form "should".)

This is overly simplified; there's a great explanation by Fowler that I'll try to find.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
OsoGegenHest
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

It still has that meaning in English. "I won't!" is a refusal rather than a prediction, and the noun "will" and the participle "willing" are entirely about wanting.

-2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ec-2013

"i want the turtle?" doesn't work?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrcakey
mrcakey
  • 12
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 9

If you change round the subject and the verb it forms a question in Dutch: "ik wil de schildpad" = I want the turtle; "wil ik de schildpad" = Do I want the turtle?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alphathon

Technically you can phrase it just like the declarative sentence too, as long as you include the question mark (or, in spoken language, an upward infection). I would avoid doing so on Duolingo though since the software may not be the best at picking up on that. Also, in English doing so implies that you are looking for confirmation or similar, which I don't think the Dutch sentence does.

0
Reply2 years ago