"Labhraím."

Translation:I speak.

4 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1735

I should add this to my list of confusables. I just mis-translated this as "books".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BardAaron

Yeah, I picked up that it was a verb, but because it's so similar to "book" my mind jumps to thinking "obviously, this means 'reading.'"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peyton375941

The way the speaker says it makes the first part sound like the word "loud" and loud is a type of speech so thats how I remeber this one.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nathan85554

But why would it be loudrím

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EliStuart

She sounds like she is saying lau-DEEM. Is that just her pronouncing it wrong, or is it actually pronounced that way?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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The sound is not an English "r" or a "d". It's actually a tap/flap, like in the English "bitter". The IPA symbol is /ɾ/. http://www.ipachart.com/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EliStuart

Why thank you! I have no use for lingouts, so I give them to people who are helpful and wright good responses. I can see that you took some time to find that! Thank you! Go raibh maith agat!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Languagease

Why is the end pronounced "-- iam?" Instead of "-- aim."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UaSirideain

When it comes to pronunciation, a fada (á ó ú í é) takes precedence over the surrounding vowels.

í = as in knee

é = as in face

á = as in log

ú = as in pool

ó = as in goal

It's also worth noting that Irish words typically get stress on the first syllable, but if there's a fada present in the word, that syllable gets stress instead.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiniatureHero

At the same time, I would pronounce this as "Labh-reem" as opposed to the "Labh-riam" heard in the audio. Would that be incorrect or is it a dialect thing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UaSirideain

Could be a dialect thing, but I'd say our dialects are fairly non-standard.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DiegoJaviUnlam
DiegoJaviUnlam
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So interesting! Thanks a lot UaSirideain!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Also, have a look at the succinct description here, just before the massive chart: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_orthography#Vowels

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nathan85554

Because e and i go together and a o u go together so it would be say labhraím instead of labhríam.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucid42day

The audio on this is confusing to me. It SOUNDS like it is "Lou-dim" where "Lou" is like "loud" I would have thought it would sound more like "Lav-rah-eem" or maybe "Lah-rheem". The synthesizer someone else clued me in to makes it sound more like "lorim". I just wonder if anyone else has any input on this.

http://www.abair.tcd.ie/?lang=eng

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1735

The Irish r is actually a flap, like the English "latter". It's neither a "t" nor a "d". The IPA symbol is /ɾ/. The English r is symbolized as /ɹ/ in the IPA. http://www.ipachart.com/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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It mightn't actually be a "t" or a "d" but [ɾ] is an allophone of both [t] and [d] in English, so "t"s and "d"s often reduce to this sound. It's natural for native English speakers to map this sound back to "t" or "d" because we don't actually hear it as a different sound.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna818050

How do you give people lingots?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1735

If you're on the actual website instead of using the app, "Give Lingot" is an option in the same line as upvote, downvote, and "Reply".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace419433

How can someone tell the difference between when it says speak or I speak? If someone knows, please respond.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1735

Irish verbs only conjugate in the first person, although it's not conjugation per se but a synthetic form that incorporates the "mé" or "muid" into the word.

I speak = labhraíonn mé OR labhraím
we speak = labhraíonn muid OR labhraíonn sinn OR labhraímid
you speak = labhraíonn tú
he speaks = labhraíonn sé
she speaks = labhraíonn sí
y'all speak = labhraíonn sibh
they speak = labhraíonn siad

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace419433

Oh... Well thanks! That was very helpful. (BTW Doctor Who rules!!!)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thatsmekyra

soooo waiitt, is Labhraíonn sibh more of an informal way of saying they?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1735

No. is the singular "you" and sibh is the plural "you" (y'all). Irish does not have the formal/informal distinction.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zinthak

These 2 words...read and speak, keep getting me confused :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AstroVulpes
AstroVulpes
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So, "I speak" ≠ "I talk"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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In some languages "to speak" is only used for languages, i.e. "I speak English" and "I talk to him" but not "I speak to him". I don't know if this is the case for Irish or not though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yevb0
yevb0
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Duo of not accepting 'talk' as a translation for Labhraoinn

5 months ago
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