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  5. "Tá cáca aici!"

" cáca aici!"

Translation:She has a cake!

August 30, 2014

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelly-Rose

I can't stop laughing at this one because "caca" is "poop" in Spanish lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

It is in Irish without the fada.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan2538

Sometimes I've heard people calling poop "caca" in English too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoeGip

the á gives it a long 'aww' sound not an a sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

It's poop in Serbian too, but spelt as кака/kaka


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Devianostin

In Russian "caca" means "poop" too. In Russian it is babytalking


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DragaoRenascido

In Portuguese, "Ta caca aici" is phonetically similar to "Ta caca aqui" = "It's poopy here", or "it's a mess here". Really helps remember.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaureenOA

I do not understand why Ta is used in this sentence, I thought the verb aici was the whole verb for to have?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mollydot

aici isn't a verb. It means "at her". Tá cáca aici -> a cake is at her -> she has a cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brigids.em

Is bréag é an cáca!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pamhsiehca

While we're on the subject, what are the cakes in Ireland like?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceNine99

Now how do you say "lie" (the noun) in Irish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

The Irish for "a lie" is bréag.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceNine99

"Is an cáca bréag", then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Is bréag é an cáca, but in truth, that doesn't really capture the meme, and you'd probably be better off with a non-copular statement like bréag atá sa cháca!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceNine99

I'm trying to dissect the literal meaning there... I'm gonna make the bold guess that there's a droppped verb of some sort making the whole thing imply "It's a lie that's in the cake!"

How close am I?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

It's a meme - there is nothing special implied in the different form, it just strikes me that stylistically it's a better match for translating the meme.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kenan820

Fadas are you friends!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob876380

What is 'She has cake' in Irish? (so, without the 'a')


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Irish doesn't have indefinite articles. there is no difference between "She has a cake" and "She has cake" in Irish - they are both Tá cáca aici.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob876380

Thanks for your comment. Than Duolingo does not judge well: My 'She has cake' was taken as incorrect ... ;-))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaisleyDragon

I get excited about cake too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrikrishna1

Is c and ch pronounced alike.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeno857

Thanks for the link! Angael looks like a useful magazine...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

It is pronounced /'ə.kʲi/ as in keep.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aeryn

Wiktionary uses [ˈɛcɪ], indicating the sound represented by "c" is an unvoiced palatal plosive. http://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/aici Can any Irish linguists weigh in here? Is this a regional thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

There’s some variability in the pronunciation of a slender c.

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