" cáca aici!"

Translation:She has a cake!

4 years ago

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
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I can't stop laughing at this one because "caca" is "poop" in Spanish lol.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It is in Irish without the fada.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
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Funny how poop is so similar to cake.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oppikoppi
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To a toddler

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
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Isn't it funny how "funny" has five different meanings.

  • Causing laughter or amusement.
  • Strange or peculiar.
  • Arousing suspicion; There was something funny going on.
  • Informal meaning slightly unwell.
  • British informal meaning eccentric or slightly deranged

But if you didn't know this, maybe you could go ask a toddler.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oppikoppi
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Adding to what you wrote in your first comment, I didn't think you meant it that way, but thanks for pointing out the obvious.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Desiree29977

So like the Spanish "tengo _ años"...better remember those squigles!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn
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Well, most people tienen anos too, so it's not wholly inaccurate...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
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Yes, but most people have only one! "Tengo veinte anos" makes you a medical marvel. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susanstory
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Sometimes I've heard people calling poop "caca" in English too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Intifadanow

also in Hebrew, borrowing from spanish

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simon_S.
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I actually think Hebrew borrowed it from German.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tempestflame

I'm pretty sure Spanish was borrowing from Hebrew, considering the Hebrew nation began to exist long before the Hispanic and Italic nations did... Not trying to flame, just trying to bust facts around. :P

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pinewoodbulwark

Nations arent languages and the latin languages existed well before hebrew as a language did.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gerrard23
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Pretty sure people were speaking and pooing before they invented religions.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexKlenin

Huh in Russian as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sarahgummybears

Hehe in arabic too xD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjanrhod
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i speak spanish and can't stop laughing!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
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Originally in English the final "e" was pronounced for all words, so "cake" would have sounded very similar to "cáca".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoeGip
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the á gives it a long 'aww' sound not an a sound.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilfriap
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When will they release speaking exercises for irish? I wanna learn how to speak it correctly. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pamhsiehca
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Someone ought to put one on YouTube. Basic pronunciation exercises are good, especially when you start a new language.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bomberman4242
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In Portuguese, "Ta caca aici" is phonetically similar to "Ta caca aqui" = "It's poopy here", or "it's a mess here". Really helps remember.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjanrhod
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hahaha think the same xD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maureen.Lisa

I do not understand why Ta is used in this sentence, I thought the verb aici was the whole verb for to have?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UaSirideain

Aici isn't a verb. It's a contraction of the preposition "ag (at)" and the pronoun "sí (her)".

Literally the sentence says "there is cake at her" which is the Irish way of saying she has it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maureen.Lisa

Thank you very much for explaining :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brit41515

Thank you! Ive been confused about agat and aici. The literal translations help my comprehension tremendously.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lara402
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There seem to be a lot of exclaimation marks in this course, are they used more frequently in Irish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tempestflame

Nope: The Irish just yell a lot (Best stereotype EVER). :D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pamhsiehca
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I found them to be soft spoken, in fact many of them asked me why Americans talked so loud.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/infinityhappycat

I wonder this as well. Or is it just part of the course? :/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrikrishna1
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Is c and ch pronounced alike.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luiz.calheiros

It is pronounced /'ə.kʲi/ as in keep.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aeryn
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Wiktionary uses [ˈɛcɪ], indicating the sound represented by "c" is an unvoiced palatal plosive. http://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/aici Can any Irish linguists weigh in here? Is this a regional thing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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There’s some variability in the pronunciation of a slender c.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread
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In the north of Ireland we use 'cac' to describe anything that's no good. eg 'The weather's a bit cac today'. I'm guessing there's link here with the Irish 'caca'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pamhsiehca
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While we're on the subject, what are the cakes in Ireland like?

9 months ago
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