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  5. "Non pensare troppo!"

"Non pensare troppo!"

Translation:Don't think too much!

August 30, 2014

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slababateria

How will I be able to finish the exercise then?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donna_Diana

Good advice for frustrated language students! Don't think too much about it, just enjoy what you do learn! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a-muktar

Like those f$&@% clitics!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Devilini

I still don't even understand what a clitic is :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a-muktar

Hard to explain, hard to understand. It's annoying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ivan802653

I have translated the word clitic with the google tranlator to my mother language and you can guess which part of woman's body was the result.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a-muktar

But some stuff just annoys and p!sses you off.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominikKur6

Perchè non: non pensi troppo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanKing1

Someone else may have pointed this out, but the second person negative imperative in Italian uses non + infinitive, rather than conjugating the verb, as in positive imperative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukman.A

Perchè, non pensi troppo = "you don't think too much" in inglese.

Mentre, "don't think too much!" = non pensare troppo!.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davecms

You don't think too much (non pensi troppo).

If I'm telling someone not to think too much - surely that's the direct translation????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukman.A

Ah, you are right! I have edited it. Sure and thanks for reminding me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresinha

The Italian imperative negative is built with infinitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ddonald77

Same here. Does Italian, like Spanish, use the infinitive as a strong imperative as in ¡No fumar!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RikSha

Indeed, why not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomCanadian12

The thought police are always listening!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilAustiniano

non ho questo problema


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crafty_Carver

Reference to the Michel Thomas method?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

It's sneaky, and great, how they just taught us a negative command. And in the last sentence they taught the Future Phrasal (Va a ....)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thaluin

Probably the best you can do with all those weird sentences Duo wants us to translate^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Queso17

I've been thinking too much; help me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aniltuncel

why not "Non pensi troppo!" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joseph.abr

This almost seems like it could be reflexive? Non pensarti troppo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoitaliano

I wrote the translation as "Don't think so much" and was marked wrong. Wouldn't "so much" and "too much" have the same meaning in this context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AidennQueen

Why is it Non venite qui but Non pensare troppo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sedona2007

Verb conjugation tables will show you the conjugation rules for imperative (command) mood in Italian.
All imperatives follow the same rules of changing a positive command to a negative command by simply adding "non" to the imperative form, with ONE NOTED EXCEPTION:
Although the second person singular (the "tu" form), uses the appropriately conjugated form of the imperative for positive commands, it ALWAYS uses the INFINITIVE for NEGATIVE COMMANDS. And, of course, the "tu" form is VERY common. We usually tell someone familiar to us to do or not do something.

Vieni qui. (You) Come here!
Non venire qui. (You) Don't come here!

Venite qui. (You all) Come here!
Non venite qui. (You all) Don't come here.

Pensa più. (You) Think more!
Non pensare troppo. (You) Don't think too much!

Pensate più. (You all) Think more!
Non pensate troppo. (You all) Don't think too much!

http://tutorino.ca/grammatica/2007/1/8/bossing-people-around-in-italian-the-imperative.html

Buried deep in the verbiage on the website:
"To make a negative command (don’t do something), simply put non before the imperative. Tu is the exception. Here use non + infinitive."

https://www.thoughtco.com/the-imperative-mood-in-italian-4072739 is also a very good site for more explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarterPryor

Motto of modern politics


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anastime

Don't think a lot! Wrong!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

Non è possibile pensare troppo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oasis44

Trump 2020 campaign slogan


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomGosset

"Do not over-think" should be accepted right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Osnakezz

Overthinking is more like thinking about a certain matter. E.g. 'I want to overthink this' when talking about taking an important decision like buying a car.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanKing1

To me, "over-think" sounds like corporate-speak and not mainstream English.

Although we're touching base on this, maybe we're not on the same page.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomGosset

I had no idea it was not mainstream English, I heard it quite often (mostly at work though...). Thanks for your reply!

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