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"El perfecto compañero"

Translation:The perfect peer

5 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JimVahl

The Duo English translation of "the perfect peer" is very unnatural, at least in American English. It should be "the perfect companion".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Toria54

The other "hover hint", besides peer and companion, is partner. That would also be much better than peer, and if even the Brits don't use peer like that, I don't know where Duo got that translation! But luckily it accepted companion for me (9/3/15).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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There is really no perfect English translation for compañero. I think buddy, mate, good friend is probably the spirit of the word, but those sound too casual in some cases--and colleague sounds too formal in others. Duolingo accepts "companion" here...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mata48495

I fell like its a combination of friend and coworker or friendly team mate ... its not friend or coworker.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Why is adjective before the noun?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sweetkundy

Yeah I am also concerned about this. I have seen Duolingo accept my answers whether I have the adjective after the noun when I forget, then sometime it will count it as wrong...Is anyone a native speaker who knows if this would be "taboo"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNagel

Not a native speaker but have an excellent book, Spanish by N. Scarlyn Wilson. First, adjectives are usually after the noun, so if in doubt put it after. No Spanish native will fail to understand you. Now for the exceptions. If an adjective is very short, little more than an ornament, a general epithet applying to a whole class rather than one instance, or used figuratively, it comes BEFORE the noun. For example, una estrecha amistad, a close (literally "narrow") friendship. The adjective is being used figuratively (can't measure friendship in inches or yards), hence comes before the noun. El docto profesor is "the learned profesor", and because the adjective is a mere ornament (professors are always learned, or should be) it precedes the noun. However, it comes after the noun in el soldado docto because it is no mere ornament. It is describing a specific instance. Since docto here is describing something distinctive, it comes after the noun. Bueno and malo come before the noun and with a peculiarity all their own, are shortened to buen and mal before singular masculine nouns. Grande shortens to gran before singular nouns of any gender but only when indicating importance, not size. El perfecto compañero is expressing something metaphorically: there is no such thing as literally "perfect" in this example. And that is why it comes before the noun. But we have el circulo perfecto because "perfect" is being used literally to describe the specific circle. OK, hope that helps.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

That's just wierd in English. No one would say that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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I used companion myself in this translation. However, the disadvantage of companion is that it implies that the person in question accompanies you everywhere, doesn't it? Whereas peers certainly does not, as in the phrase jury of one's peers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineReyes

I left the tilda off of the N and was discounted a heart!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juana511941

Even though its a bit dated, comrade still gets used and partner--as in "partner in crime" seem much better than mate--rarely used as pal or buddy in US.--tho people know what you mean.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azizspanish

Does 'el companero perfecto' exist (sorry, typing with an english keyboard - i know the n should have its squiggly thing!!!) I guess we'll find out on an oral exercise!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I did some research to understand why the adjective 'perfecto' has been placed before compañero. So far the best explanation I found was that when the adjective is subjective or emotional meaning it is placed before the noun. As well you can sometimes indicate a certain amount of appreciation for that quality and/or a certain amount of emphasis. Again by placing the adjective first.

JimVahl I agree that 'the perfect peer' sounds weird.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azizspanish

As always, many thanks rmcgwn!!! Really appreciate your insight!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineReyes

If you want to be the laughing stock of a conversation continue to use "peer". I am English and you would never use this word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLdawg

Man if using "peer" will get you laughed at, you must hang with some cruel peeps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaud
jamaud
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Yep, made me think of The House of Lords and I don't think perfect is a word I would use for any of them!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porkrind94
porkrind94
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oops! I made a mistake. I meant to say they should change it from companion to company. If they want to be a useful tool for learners. Also who is going to trust them to take their tests if they can't get basic translations correct. I have need of taking the test, but I can't trust their accuracy yet! I hope they take an interest in doing a great job not just a so-so one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineReyes

Mr. Deactivated User: I meant in everyday speech would probably cause a titter at least. But of course if you were an English Language student then your well educated companeros would understand.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

Could this be used in a sentence where you are stating that cranberry sauce is the perfect companion to turkey?

Merry Christmas btw!

7 months ago