"Itheann na mná ceapaire agus ólann siad bainne."

Translation:The women eat a sandwich and they drink milk.

4 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ditty_Kitty

Multiple women eating one sandwich? I think this sentence should be altered.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
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Why so? Two women could be sharing a sandwich...maybe they're on a diet? Or maybe a groups of woman are sharing a massive sandwich for the sake of it? We can't judge these women for eating the one sandwich...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jytou
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My guess is that if they were eating sandwitches, it would be plural in the Irish sentence, and we should be able to catch that. Given my current level in Irish I wouldn't be able to make the plural "sandwiches", though :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarthPontifex

I kinda agree with Ditty, maybe accept both? Seems like both can be used. Just a thought.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Both can't be used. This sentence can only mean "The women eat a sandwich ..."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Otterbot630

It could also easily mean they're each eating a sandwich, which is how I interpreted it. "They're eating sandwiches" could mean they each have their own as well, but it could also mean they're each eating multiple sandwiches.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

perhaps the word "each" is implied here as in colloquial speech

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brianna779416

That is exactly what I was thinking!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baddums

Could mean simply two women. My mom and I split sandwiches still when we get together, just like we did when I was younger. I think it is fine ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cael55
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When I hear the word "mná" it sounds like "mraw". I keep hearing an "r" sound.

How is it pronounced?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bottss1
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According to wiktionary, mná is pronounced /mˠɾˠɑː/ in Connacht. Link: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mn%C3%A1

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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For people who don't understand the International Phonetic Alphabet, a link to the sound database at www.teanglann.ie might be more helpful:
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/mn%c3%a1

In both Ulster Irish and Connacht Irish, certain worlds that are spelled with an "n" have an "r" pronunciation. (cnoc is another example that crops up on Duolingo). In Munster Irish, and for most people who aen't native speakers from Connacht or Ulster, the "n" is pronounced as an "n".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredWeasley11005

Still laughing at the fact that scrolling over the words and getting this translation: "Eat the women sandwich."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

I think we should here the "d" in siad as I thought she was saying "se" ie he

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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Although the d in siad might not be easily heard in this recording, the two vowel sounds are clear, so it still makes sense to conclude that siad was spoken rather than .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heysoos1
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Na mná sounds like "na mrra." Is that standard?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trodaire

It seems so. When I first encountered it i had trouble, too. I searched a bit and the majority of the time it was "mraw" and once i heard "mno" with a hard o.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ursulakell9

what is the plural of sandwich?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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The Irish for "sandwiches" is ceapairí.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MishaFromMayo

It sure sounds - on multiple listenings - as if she's saying "Ithim na mna..." Or am I just losing my mind?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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An Irish broad n is pronounced with greater velarization than an English N, so it can sometimes sound like an English M.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MishaFromMayo

Thanks! This will require a higher sensitivity in listening for me. What a beautiful - and difficult - language this is.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SilverPill

I vote that this sentence is muck. Just because English has gone to the dogs doesn't mean it should drag other languages down with it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anke675405

this sentence comes up in EVERY round of practice and it is driving me mad!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ann39714

I though na was plural, why is it not 'an' for one sandwich

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dubhglasM

'na mná' = "the women", so 'na' is being used as plural. Break it up into the parts like this:: (itheann) - (na mná) - (ceapaire)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uneframagegrande

How can multiple women eat a singular sandwich?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heithr
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I put "The women are eating a sandwich and drinking milk." Does this sentence imply that a "they" othwr than the women are drinking milk?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trodaire

Your translation would be "Tá na mná ag ith ceapaire agus ag ól bainne," I think. (Maybe mbainne?) (Also my sentence structure may be flawed, as I'm nowhere near fluent yet.) Ag ith would mean that they are presently eating and ag ól would be them presently drinking.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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Almost right - it's ag ithe. And there is no eclipsis, so you were right the first time with ag ól bainne. (After ag+verbal-noun you use the genitive, but in this case, the genitive of ceapaire is ceapaire and the genitive of bainne is bainne).

The important point is that Irish and English both differentiate between the simple present (itheann na mná - "the women eat") and the present progressive (tá na mná ag ithe - "the women are eating"). Some other languages don't make that distinction, but you can't translate the simple present in Irish or English into the present progressive in English or Irish.

Because the Subject comes before the verb in English, it is technically possible to skip a repeated subject (the first subject is still before the second verb). But in Irish the subject comes after the verb, and you can't have one subject apply to both verbs. Siad refers to na mná.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trodaire

Thanks for the correction, Satharn. Sorry about that, Heithr.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heithr
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Thank you both. I am starting to get it!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JFYDos

It's pretty crazy how similar siad sounds so much sé here. Still hadn't heard siad spoken enough to even consider it possibly being what is said. Doesn't help that sé makes grammatical sense here, either - "... agus ólann sé bainne" as "... and he drinks milks".

Or maybe I'm just crazy

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laura957091

I wish this was the Ulster version of irish my ulster accent cant pronounce the words right

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristyMat20

Why eat a??

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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English has a singular indefinite article, "a". Irish doesn't. In this case, you need to insert the English singular indefinite article to make a sensible English translation, even though it is not present in the Irish sentence.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ursulakell9

what is the Irish for multiple sandwiches?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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The plural of ceapaire is ceapairí

1 week ago
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