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"Los lugares"

Translation:The places

0
5 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/feklee
feklee
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When I peek, it says:

places
seats

Yet, "The seats" is wrong.

29
Reply35 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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A point to remember is that "all" of the drop-downs are not necessarily correct for a given sentence. You have to look at the drop-down list and choose the correct translation. Personally, I rarely use the drop-downs. When I don't know or am not sure of the correct word I will check using a dictionary or web sources.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/courierknew

True, but the context I got it in was not in a sentence. I was just told to translate the word.

11
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bex42
bex42Plus
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Yes, I do wish Duo would be a little more forgiving when asking us to translate things out of context. If "los lugares" can mean "the seats" in any context, it seems strange for it to be considered wrong when there is no context. It's not a sentence, so we can't tell. If the "seats" usage is very specific, I think it'd better not to have it in the hints.

I'd far rather learn a less common way of using a word later on and be surprised to find a word I thought I knew has another meaning than to be confused early on with a brand new word.

Can any experienced speaker enlighten me about using "lugares" to mean "seats"? Does it need to be in some sort of fixed phrase?

7
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S591555

Does anybody know I "the locations" would not work for this? Thanks!

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Justin92d

How do i know which noun is 's' or 'es' when its in plural form

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bozena64
Bozena64
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when the last letter is a consonant you add "-es" in plural form, i. e. lugar-lugares,autobus-autobuses ;otherwise just "-s" , i. e. casa-casas, hijo-hijos

14
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skeets

simple. Thanks.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chleighdo

Locations?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ItssDorian

I was taught lugares meant locations, why isn't this translation correct?

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MalikaBenjamin

Oh, los lugares vamos!

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nmtechyotes

lugares vs zonas?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephrox
stephrox
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lugar is a place like a specific area where zona is a zone or an area like a neigborhood or region. In my opinion Zona is used for more a general sense where as lugares are more specific

4
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

Is the computer's pronunciation of 'lugares' correct? I'm wondering about the 'g' sound.

(Sometimes it is more of a back-of-the-palate thing, like a very harshly aspirated English 'H' or a Hebrew 'ch', but the only examples I can come up with are when the 'g' is followed by an 'e' [general, gente, angelos]. On the other hand, I know that a lot of variations in pronunciation are regional, so I'm not sure which generalization to apply.)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coralynne
coralynne
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The pronunciation is definitely correct. The way "g" is pronounced in Spanish depends on the following vowel. For example, in the word "general," the "g" would be pronounced as an (as you say "harshly aspirated") English "h." The same goes for other ge- words like gente, gerente, genial, etc., as well as gi- words like girar. For other ga- words as well as go- and gu- words, the pronunciation of "g" would be the same as in lugar (ex: ganar, gastar, golpear, gobierno, guión, gusta, etc.) This could very slightly depending on region, but I've never heard of alternate pronunciations for any of these words. Hope this helps!

6
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shargad
Shargad
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C and G before E and I are pronounced "S" and a rough "H" respectively. Before a consonant or A, O, U, the C and G are "hard", e.g., "Kay" and "Gay". Very similar to the treatment in English: C or G + I or E is usually pronounced "S", and "J" (as in jay); before consonants or A, O, U, usually will be Kay and Gay.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

I did finally learn this, as I went along, but thank you so much for answering so completely!

0
Reply3 years ago