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  5. "A húll agus a úll."

"A húll agus a úll."

Translation:Her apple and his apple.

August 31, 2014

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickKelly0

Why is there a h for the first úll but not the second?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liamog

his, her and their are all spelled the same in Irish - the difference is in their effect on the following word.

  • a úll = his apple
  • a húll = her apple
  • a n-úll = their apple
  • m'úll = my apple
  • d'úll = your apple
  • ár n-úll = our apple
  • bhur n-úll = your (plural) apple

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiddo-depido

If you add two spaces at the end of a line
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2324

And anyone who wants to learn more about how to format comments on Duolingo can read about Markdown.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiddo-depido

You can do cool things {@style=color: red; text-decoration: underline}


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VyxyChan

But what if the object doesnt start with a vowel, how do you differentiate them?


[deactivated user]

    a chóta = his coat (cóta is lenited)

    a cóta = her coat (no lenition)

    When the noun starts with a consonant which cannot be lenited, e.g. léine, then you have to infer from the context.

    Example: Chuir sí a léine uirthi. We know it's her shirt because of the pronoun .


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2324

    Sorry. I realize now I asked the wrong question. I was distracted when I typed that. I meant to say "shirt". You had already explained lenition on /k/ and I was wondering about consonants like /l/ that can't be lenited.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2324

    So then how would you distinguish between "I have his coat" and "I have her coat"? Unless you just need the greater context of the rest of the conversation?


    [deactivated user]

      Tá a chóta agam, tá a cóta agam. It's only when the noun cannot be lenited as in the earlier example that you have to rely on the context.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex873677

      now i've read the comments i'm starting to get it(?) but fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuudge this was a curve ball; thanks duolingo mobile, you did nothing to prepare me for this


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arancaytar

      The gender of the owner is marked on the object the possessive applies to? Ouch, this is hard...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alibax

      Well, you know you're staying to get it when you write the English after listening to the Irish audio without even realizing it!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikemahlbacher

      "a hool agus a eev". I don't get the pronunciation of the last word. Is it mistaken or is there a rule of pronunciation I need to know?


      [deactivated user]

        The speaker is actually saying "a hool agus a ool" although it is easy to think she is saying "a oov". Listen very carefully and you can hear the "l" sound.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikemahlbacher

        it's the ee in eev that is getting me. If she was saying agus a ool I'd be a happy camper. But I'm not getting the long "oo" at all in that last word in her pronunciation. Played it a bunch of times and could not make it into an "oo".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
        • 2324

        I'm being sincere here and not snarky at all. I think we're listening to two different recordings, don't ask me how. I don't hear anything like "ee" here.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikemahlbacher

        Rae F, you're right. It now sounds totally different than it did for me earlier today. I had listened to it multiple times this morning and then later when Moloughl wrote back and it sounded like ee. But just checked it again and it sounds like oo like I would expect. Maybe someone's just pranking the yanks. Thanks.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josefderry

        Since ''A'' and ''a'' mean....he, she, its; is it the addition of the ''h '' that determines the gender of the owner


        [deactivated user]

          is it the addition of the ''h '' that determines the gender of the owner

          Yes, for words that begin with a vowel. Please read Liamog's comment at the beginning of this discussion.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
          • 2324

          his/her, not he/she.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colettedil1

          This I find difficult


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sissy681549

          I'm really enjoying the commentary in these threads. But can anyone tell how how I might open the embedded weblinks as it ain't happening within my mobile app in S Armagh! Lol


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
          • 2324

          Just directly paste in the URL.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jackrabbit49er

          According to Progress in Irish, his causes aspiration but hers does not.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

          That’s true for nouns beginning with lenitable consonants, e.g. a pióg agus a phióg (“her pie and his pie”). For nouns beginning with vowels, hers gets a prefixed H and his doesn’t. “Aspiration” is how some books refer to lenition; the prefixed H is not an example of lenition.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
          • 2324

          “Aspiration” is how some books refer to lenition; the prefixed H is not an example of lenition.

          That's unfortunate. Lenition is the weakening of a sound, for example from a stop to a fricative. Aspiration is the pronunciation of /h/.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FearDorcha5

          Like others before me, I heard "a hool, agus a oov" every time I listened to it. Usually, an L sound is articulated quite clearly.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
          • 2324

          That last sound is an "L" with a bit of rough noise after it. You can always flag it and report a problem with the audio.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
          Mod
          • 1481

          It's often more effective to force a reload of the page, or just open the URL in a different browser.

          I'm listening to the audio directly and I can't really hear anything particularly wrong with it.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
          • 2324

          I just listened to the embedded file and the direct file back-to-back and they both sound the same to me, with an h-like sound at the very end.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
          Mod
          • 1481

          I hear the expected relaxation of the muscles, and release of the remaining breath that is no longer required, as the speaker is finished speaking.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisBirch0

          this doesn't make sense. think about it.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
          • 2324

          It is a point of grammar that is rather different than what English-speakers are used to. The explanation for how it works is here: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ga/Possessives


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harpinsquirrel

          Mine didn't have a difference and I still got it wrong. Even though they were spelled the name, it said it had both genders, but it didn't!


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

          There will be a difference. As Liamog pointed out above, with a meaning " her", you have to add an "h" to the following word if it starts with a vowel.

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