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"Usted puede partir el emparedado."

Translation:You can cut the sandwich.

5 years ago

163 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Nobody says emparedado any longer.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loonce

Yeah, my spanish-speaking roommates (from Bolivia and Peru) laughed out loud at how strange this word was. Apparently it sounds really weird! Most people say "sandwich," so I'm told.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
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Thanks! I keep using "emparedado" with Spanish speaking patients and they never have any idea what I am saying.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ann.Ahin
Ann.AhinPlus
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On my holiday in S America, an emperadado was a small pie or pasty!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anniejosephine

In Spain, emperadado also means a slice of filo pastry filled in the middle with a sort of custard or cream.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spanielle2

What do they say?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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Spanielle2, they say "sándwich/bocadillo. In Mexico "sándwich" is more common.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rilianxi
rilianxi
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Yeah, people in texas don't even know what I'm saying if I say bocadillo. they say sandwich.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SveinGystad

The people in Texas speak English!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rilianxi
rilianxi
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No they don't. They speak lots of different languages. And some of the speak spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kg5rk
kg5rk
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When you listen to the local radio stations, it is half spanish & half english ! "Tex-Mex"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UmaObasi

Nosotros pensamos que TX es en EUA?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Banana_Man24

Right, like I speak English and I am learning spanish. I know Swedish, Mexican, English, and even Dutch people in Florida.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adam57

bocadillo i thought was guava? When I was in venezuela I would ask for a bocadillo y queso pastele and it would be guava and cheese. sooo goood

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b-reasonable

ooooo yum! That does sound delicious

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schatzie14

Bocadillo seems the norm, even in Spain

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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I agree that in Spain bocadillo is the norm but it is not the norm in Mexico. I lived in Mexico for 9 years and never heard bocadillo used. Sandwich in Mexico was always "sandwich.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bmr209
bmr209
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In my experience, Mexicans normally use the word torta but I guess that could just be a type of sandwich. I would normally use sandwich or sanduche but I have no idea if sanduche is just spanglish. I would suggest just using the word sandwich.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

You may find this interesting http://www.duolingo.com/comment/222398

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Espeonage24

I learned "sándwich" in my spanish class, but everyone forgot where the accent went. I hope i got it right.

Otherwise I would say ""Bocadillo."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrBymur
HerrBymur
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bocadilla

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GMikey

it's bocadillo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/somelauw
somelauw
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How about el bocadillo?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GMikey

bocadillo all the way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MUSICGIRL444

what do you mean?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james0214

I thought it was 'la sandwich'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterB44
PeterB44
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In Spain, no-one I have ever spoken to even knows the word "emparedado" they use bocadillo for a roll and sandwich for a sliced bread sandwich- which they usually expect to serve toasted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SenoraTwite

Can partir mean to share - or is compartir to share??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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"compartir" = to share

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MistyLa

Also, to say "split the sandwich" sounds very American. For those of us who speak variations of British English, "share" the sandwich is more natural.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bkinformatica

i put in "share" and it was rejected

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MistyLa

Same here, I don't think it should have been.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

"Share" is included in the possible meanings of "partir", but I don't think this is what Duolingo was looking for in this sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UmaObasi

I think "share" may not work here because "share" means that two or more people eventually OWN the parts AFTER the sandwich has been CUT or SPLIT. You may cut, split or break your sandwich and all of it is still yours. However, once you SHARE it, then ownership is SHARED. (Caveat: SPLIT is also an Americanism for Share. Yea, I know)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daweshillroad

I don't think it's English vs American usage, I just think the word "share" should be accepted. Share and split in the context of sandwiches are both common. FWIW I put "share" and it was rejected.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
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I tried "share" also, but I was thrown by "compartir" which is closer to "share" and the US "split" usage. Split or cut describes partir

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindPradhan

I had a really bad sandwich at Heathrow.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CBreitenbuecher

I've never in my life heard anyone say they would "part" a sandwich. Share. Divide. Something else. It doesn't matter what the precise meaning of partir is. "Part a sandwich" is just strange English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Treecie

This is another slightly "odd" sentence for DL. Admittedly, I used share and then realized that is "compartir". However, oftentimes we cannot translate word for word Spanish to English. It is important (IMO) that we train our minds to think in Spanish when translating from English. An obvious example is saying I am 20 years old. It is not ser or estar, we use tengo....(I have...) Continue to enjoy the learning process!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MistyLa

I agree with you. Share in english means to divide among people which is exactly what is happening in this sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

How can you declare so emphatically that it is exactly what is happening in this sentence. Someone might be taking lessons in using a knife to cut sandwiches. You're putting a lot of extra meaning behind a simple statement.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arron220
arron220
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Yeah, sorry guys this actually means 'to cut' the sandwich (ie. with a knife) rather than share. And the given translation 'to part' the sandwich is not particularly good English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nachteul

So do I, but then I'm often annoyed at how narrow the translations are. There is a lot of English between Received Pronunciation and American!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dagata.Hansen

I also thought the share caught the essence of the sentance

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sieglug
sieglug
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divide or split is better than cut here

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

Indeed. But did someone try it successfully?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

You can split the sandwich worked today (11.3.14)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

but divide was not accpeted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

still not accepts 08/06/2014

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1cookieplease

Still 9/17/14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrBymur
HerrBymur
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12/3/15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sollihein
Sollihein
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it is accepted as of today 13 Aug 2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

Agree! SpanishDict gives divide as a correct translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emma.jickells

I would have said share is better than split, in English anyway

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luvlearning

Share is a different word - compartir

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sierrasue50

I had "You are able to cut the sandwich" marked wrong. I know it sounds pretty formal, but it should be right....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanniepq

I had this marked wrong as well. Don't understand why. Poder means to be able.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

I put 'you are able to cut the sandwich', which is perfectly correct. I don't know why it was marked wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanniepq

For some reason, DL only accepts the verb 'poder' as 'can', not 'to be able to'. See my point up above.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

In another sentence in the same exercise, able to was accepted. Maybe the answers are graded by a machine which doesn't have understanding of the correct meanings.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir_Carl
Sir_Carl
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Why doesn’t partir translate to divide?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ComicOzzie

partir = leave, as I just learned in the previous sentence

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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partir also means to divide.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatricioJiang

Moses parted the sea, we are going to part this sandwich!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/newrat
newrat
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So why wasn't "you can leave the sandwich" accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LLB1964
LLB1964
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I had that rejected, too. All i can think of is that in that sense you are not 'departing' the sandwich...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Supra__

you can leave the sandwich.. to me, that would be "Puedes dejar el sándwich"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aeronautix
Aeronautix
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I have the same question. Must "dejar" be used to mean "to leave (the sandwich)", and never "partir"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

It can also mean "to split open" or to "crack open". I would not use it to "cut", although it might sometimes.

The proper translation for to cut is cortar, in any case.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nancybp

The English translation by DL is "You can cut the sandwich"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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I guess the difference is if the verb is transitive, if you parte something, then it means to cut and if it's intransitive (no object) then it means to leave.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/averrryyyyyy

I put, "You may cut the sandwich." but it didn't accept it as "may" only "can" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Would "Usted puede cortar el emparedado" work?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J_oseBravo

En español casi no se usa "partir" para este caso. Sería más correcto o común "cortar" Ya que inglés se está usando el verbo "to cut". Imagino que para dividir o compartir en inglés se usan otras formas al igual que en español. No se, "partir" puede que sea referente pero no es lo mismo, no me suena bien. (Creo que "split" es más cercano a "partir")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LesliePayne0

My dictionary says "partir" means to share, as well as to divide

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/futuredrwoborder
futuredrwoborder
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@daalianer it told me that answer was the right one. Who on earth says "part the sandwich," at least if english is your first language....but apparently thats the answer duo is looking for

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sav214782

I spelled sandwich wrong and got the whole sentence wrong...grammar mistakes shouldn't make the whole sentence wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir_Carl
Sir_Carl
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Yeah, but were you using a Mac?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4evalucky

How on earth do you 'part' a sandwich?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

Partir also means to divide, share, or split.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SvetlanaKl3
SvetlanaKl3
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I translated this as "You can leave the sandwich"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aarononlyforward

me too

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dvivian

No one says "part the sandwich"...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DebbieGrah

spanishdict.com, and wordreference.com and Advanced Español-Inglés VOX all include divide in the definition of partir.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/special_k1980

Couldn't you also say "halve the sandwich"? We say it a lot in Ireland and Britain.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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"to go ends on the sandwich", it sort of means to share food or leftovers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulaGriffin

split is an American word. In England we would use, cut, half or share the sandwich.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brianchristie

Share is correct. Duolingo need to update. If the sandwich was to be cut the verb cortar would be used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lifeseyephoto

So, is this addressed to "you all", and that's why it's puede instead of puedes?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

Usted puede is the singular formal form for 'you'. "You all" is ustedes pueden. 'Puedes' is the familiar form for 'you'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lifeseyephoto

Thanks. I had forgotten the formal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buttercup659755

I accidentally hit the quote key - answer was correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eleanora454185

My club code is BPER39. It's lots of fun!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimshem
Jimshem
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The translation above is acceptable but "part the sandwich" ( which appeared in the lesson) is not idiomatic English! The translation "share the sandwich" is also reasonable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken596028

'you can part the sandwich' (given in main lesson) is not a good translation. Cut (shown above) is better.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mommysews
mommysews
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what is the difference between partir and cortar? don't they both mean to cut?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

Yes, either can be used to say 'cut'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"You can split the sandwich"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jbauer1414

"You can split the sandwich". Would that work?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

Or partition. I'm not sure if "cut" is the best definition here for "partir".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amazed1499
amazed1499
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"You can share the sandwich." was not accepted. Opinions?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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I think that the meaning of the sentence is to "cut" as in cut the sandwich in half as opposed to "sharing" the sandwich with someone. Just my thought.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilbPorter1

Yeah, I wondered about that too. Share seems to fit, at least in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luvlearning

"To share" is compartir. Partir is different.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DONALDWILLEMS

you can share the sandwich doesn't work go figure

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbarasmussen

[rotated ?]Partir en un emparedado con unas tijeras o qué? (Cut in a sandwich with scissors or what?)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cwilden

'You could cut the sandwich' marked wrong...gaaaaah

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boneinjalon

Is it my ears or does the the pronunciation of partir sound like partid. It is not the first time...aire comes out lke hayde.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G.Eileen

I tried divide and it said I was wrong. In Mexico sandwiches are called "tortas"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/battabong

better though to cut a sandwich than cut the cheese!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeonMarkla

Very unimpressed that despite making a reasonable guess that partir means share (no hint), DL says it means split & marks it wrong. Very harsh!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tingo_Hanson

For some reason I read "emparedado" as "empresario" and got a vastly different sentence...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/senorita.heidi.k

Aca en Baja, México, dicen "torta" para sandwich.....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wayneal

You can slice the sandwich was not accepted . I think it should as to slice is to cut (something, especially food) into slices..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TommySF
TommySF
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Slice can mean cut as in "I sliced my finger open",
but typically slice means to cut something into slices, i.e. many small thin pieces. Normally a sandwich would only be cut into just two, or occasionally four, parts.
It is rarely sliced into many small thin pieces.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daalianer
Daalianer
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Why is "You can part the sandwich" wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khalil3x6

I answered:"You can slice the sandwich.' Why isn't that acceptable?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

I tried "You can slice the sandwich" but no go. I had thought compartir was "to share" and that "slice" was the same as "cut?" To slice a sandwich, like you slice bread, to slice it in two before popping it in the sandwich baggie for work/school? Would there be a different way to say "slice the sandwich" or "slice bread?" Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterDodson

My tutors laughed at me when I used emparedado.

Not a big deal, but funny.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

Emparedado also means recluse.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sbvittor
sbvittor
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Sandwich is an internation word. Nobody says emparedado.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GazMembrane

What an honor!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beaux11

In English you can express "cutting something" in more than one manner. There can be subtle differences between the meanings due to one's choice of words. For example the first 3 ideas that came to mind were "cut, slice, and chop." Then came "dice, cube, divide, separate, split, partition, bisect, disect, butcher, hack up, and piece out." Because I'm slow at typing the list expanded itself to include "parcel, mete, portion, and (just now) disperse."

Does anyone want to describe the differences between cortar and partir? Let's keep to just these 2 words so that things don't out of control.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesBel17

Whoa! Partir has multiple meanings ... confusing

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BharatWalia

Why is "you may cut the sandwich wrong" when puede can mean may or can?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

It is not wrong. Duolingo isn't a perfect system, and sometimes correct answers are marked wrong. In particular, they have somewhat of a problem with the word 'poder', which means 'to be able, can, or may'. I usually report answers that should be marked correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clarkk240

What is the difference between 'Partir' and 'Cortar'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SveinGystad

How can "share" be wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Corey2901
Corey2901
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Commenting for later

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sheilalearns

aimhave never heard emparedado in Mexico. Torta or el sandwich are used.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickAronson

Would i be wrong to translate to half the sandwich?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andreim1828

partir el queso!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MASSY0
MASSY0
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Cual es la diferencia entre "partir" y "cortar"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheilaHilt3

What on earth does "part the sandwich" mean. Never heard that expression before.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanConklin2

Pertir or conpartir could also mean share, couldn't it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rbowmani
rbowmani
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I put, "you can leave the sandwich"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mailles1

How would partir be different from cortar?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/govienna

But partir is depart and cut is cortar / picar. Or am i wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Henri232
Henri232
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The first translation that Duo came up with was "You can part the sandwich." Moses and the Reuben!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OzHey1
OzHey1
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"You can depart the sandwich" is how I translated it.. Ha

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaScud

Why is it "puede" and not "puedes" if usted means "you"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/somelauw
somelauw
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Because usted is treated the same él. "Tú puedes" and "Usted puede".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eleanora454185

My club code is BPER39. It's lots of fun!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janet299525

we would never say " part the sandwich" it would have to be "cut"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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Moses might say it if he was looking for a miracle.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drbobm
drbobm
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We cut a sandwich, we don't part a sandwich.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdriVargas040915

how was anybody even supposed to figure that out...??? I speak spanish well and i have never heard anybody say it like that...!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErinStokes7

Why is "You can leave the sandwich" wrong?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jannhill

I live in south africa... nary a Spanish speaker in sight.. but I must say. I sure know a lot of words!!! Cant string them together.. but know emparadado... thought I was soooo smart

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosiahNeth

"Partition" should be accepted for "partir".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveJolli2

Translation: You can cut the sandwich. The answer given was "You can part the sandwich." Inconsistent. Bocadillo or emperadado isn't my issue here. Surely they mean "share"? Why would you "part" a sandwich, to peer inside it? And why would anyone say "You can part the sandwich"? in the first place?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b-reasonable

I was counted wrong for saying that you could "leave" the sandwich (which I have said to my kids when they've tried to take a P,B, & J sandwich with them in my car). I know partir can mean leave - but is this the wrong kind of leave?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DebbieDrum

What a ridiculous sentence! Cut the sandwich with what? Why isn't you can share the sandwich accepted? No body says emparedado for sandwich either!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

I don't think there is an actual translation into Spanish for the English word 'sandwich', which originally came from the name of a town.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanniepq

not that it matters but it was named after John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, an eighteenth-century English aristocrat. It is said that he ordered his valet to bring him meat tucked between two pieces of bread, and others began to order "the same as Sandwich!"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

That is correct. The town of Sandwich is the small town that he was from. That is why I don't think there is a real literal translation.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garyspector1

The dictionary says partir also means share !

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garyspector1

partir is share.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TallRoberto

you can share the sandwich was rejected. i was given "you can part the sandwich' as a correct option. who talks like that?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yuridado

I did see it posted on a window in puerto rico but honestly in Colombia and costa rica people looked at me like i was crazy when i asked them for a sandwich or if they wanted one

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bernpet234

you explain "partir" as "to leave" and not to "part" or "cut"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

Goes without saying...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mads608534

Part a sandwich?? I got error from saying 'Share the sandwich'

1 year ago