"Tá geansaí aige."

Translation:He has a sweater.

4 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Stevie_T
Stevie_T
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is it a striped sweater?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Syldron

Interesting - the Norwegian word for sweater is "genser".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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The Irish (and the offspring of Irish people like myself) will also say 'gansy' in the English. I'm not sure of the spelling though. It's a corruption of 'Guernsey'. It's possible that the Swedish word has the same root.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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Of course, by Swedish, I mean I'm an idiot who can't remember what I read three seconds ago.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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do you know you can edit your comment?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I know but that'd be a bit disingenuous. I'm an idiot, there's no getting round it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Can88161

This is true honesty

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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ah come on X)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Self esteem issues it seems.I know a good psychiatrist called Fraser who charges only 150 dollars per session of one hour !!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucRom5

Cool!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceruttis
ceruttis
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Where i grew up (in Cork), geansai always meant a cardigan

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adelaide1960.

In Co. Wicklow we were taught geansai was a cardigan too. Sweater is American, jumper or pullover is more usual in Ireland.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bush6984
Bush6984
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Forgive me for being the dumb one, but what exactly is the difference between a cardigan and a sweater?

To me cardigans are usually open-front, maybe with a tie, whereas sweaters are knitted and closed-front, while sweatshirts are like gym/workout wear. Is that your Cork distinction as well? (Just wanting to make sure I learn the right hypernymy/hyponymy/generalizability of "geansai")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Personally, I’d describe a cardigan as an open-front sweater, and a pullover as a closed-front sweater; the latter is probably one of those terms that varies by dialect. The FGB offers cairdeagan for “cardigan”.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bush6984
Bush6984
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Thank you! Thanks both for the explanation, as well as for the "cairdeagan" vocab delineation versus "geansai."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrikrishna1
shrikrishna1
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Do the words "genser / geansaí or gansy and jumper" have origin in some Persian words?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I'm fairly sure the first three are corruptions of 'guernsey' and 'jumper' comes via Scots English from the French jupe and has it's origins in the Arabic jibba جوبَّة.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AodhanAthdearg

The origin of this word is from the phrase "Guernsey style pullover "

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Avodah

Note that the English word "jumper" can also mean a sweater. The Irish word geansaí only means the clothing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

Jumper in America is a style of girls' dresses

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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really? that's interesting...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

the type you generally see used for Catholic school girls' uniforms.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adelaide1960.

Girls school uniform dresses were called gymslips in Ireland

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyGaskin

gansey here in northern england too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annievlord

My translation came back as " he's a sweater". has anyone else had this?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
nahuatl1939
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OK, now it says that HE HAS ... is TA... AIGE. very well. so, why is it TA... AG and not TA... AICI when it means SHE HAS.... ? i missed something somewhere but what and where ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/birgit72635
birgit72635
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The combination of "Tá" and "ag+pronoun/person" is "have /has". So,

"Tá úll agam" - I have an apple.
"Tá úll agat" - You have an apple.
"Tá úll aige" - He has an apple.
"Tá úll aici" - She has an apple.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeWhittlestone

he has a sweater maybe it should be "the SWEATER has him"

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MacGafraidh

More accurately "the sweater is at him"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jennifercu968527

We were always taught jumper. "Sweater" is an american term and less correct in Ireland

10 months ago
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