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  5. "Tá geansaí aige."

" geansaí aige."

Translation:He has a sweater.

August 31, 2014

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevie_T

is it a striped sweater?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Syldron

Interesting - the Norwegian word for sweater is "genser".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

The Irish (and the offspring of Irish people like myself) will also say 'gansy' in the English. I'm not sure of the spelling though. It's a corruption of 'Guernsey'. It's possible that the Swedish word has the same root.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

Of course, by Swedish, I mean I'm an idiot who can't remember what I read three seconds ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

do you know you can edit your comment?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

I know but that'd be a bit disingenuous. I'm an idiot, there's no getting round it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Can88161

This is true honesty


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominicCol12

Self esteem issues it seems.I know a good psychiatrist called Fraser who charges only 150 dollars per session of one hour !!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jennifercu968527

We were always taught jumper. "Sweater" is an american term and less correct in Ireland


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaomiOFarr

We say jumper. Jumper!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntonSween

Wait a minute... Where's me jumper? Where's me jumper?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ceruttis

Where i grew up (in Cork), geansai always meant a cardigan


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adelaide1960.

In Co. Wicklow we were taught geansai was a cardigan too. Sweater is American, jumper or pullover is more usual in Ireland.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

Forgive me for being the dumb one, but what exactly is the difference between a cardigan and a sweater?

To me cardigans are usually open-front, maybe with a tie, whereas sweaters are knitted and closed-front, while sweatshirts are like gym/workout wear. Is that your Cork distinction as well? (Just wanting to make sure I learn the right hypernymy/hyponymy/generalizability of "geansai")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Personally, I’d describe a cardigan as an open-front sweater, and a pullover as a closed-front sweater; the latter is probably one of those terms that varies by dialect. The FGB offers cairdeagan for “cardigan”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

Thank you! Thanks both for the explanation, as well as for the "cairdeagan" vocab delineation versus "geansai."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrikrishna1

Do the words "genser / geansaí or gansy and jumper" have origin in some Persian words?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

I'm fairly sure the first three are corruptions of 'guernsey' and 'jumper' comes via Scots English from the French jupe and has it's origins in the Arabic jibba جوبَّة.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AodhanAthdearg

The origin of this word is from the phrase "Guernsey style pullover "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonyGaskin

gansey here in northern england too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/herredave

Does the letter "s" have three different phonetic realizations, including [s], [z] and [S] (/sh/)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avodah

Note that the English word "jumper" can also mean a sweater. The Irish word geansaí only means the clothing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arrikis1

Jumper in America is a style of girls' dresses


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

really? that's interesting...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arrikis1

the type you generally see used for Catholic school girls' uniforms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adelaide1960.

Girls school uniform dresses were called gymslips in Ireland


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barhiril

Ah, I have fond memories of those...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annievlord

My translation came back as " he's a sweater". has anyone else had this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nahuatl1939

OK, now it says that HE HAS ... is TA... AIGE. very well. so, why is it TA... AG and not TA... AICI when it means SHE HAS.... ? i missed something somewhere but what and where ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birgit72635

The combination of "Tá" and "ag+pronoun/person" is "have /has". So,

"Tá úll agam" - I have an apple.
"Tá úll agat" - You have an apple.
"Tá úll aige" - He has an apple.
"Tá úll aici" - She has an apple.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeWhittlestone

he has a sweater maybe it should be "the SWEATER has him"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacGafraidh

More accurately "the sweater is at him"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andalula

So this has an initial g because sweater is feminine? Or because he possesses it. Or is it because he possesses a girly sweater?

Or is there no such word as eansaí? And this is just vocabulary, not other lessons rolled in.

I'm starting to get confused. I need to do this on a real computer with other open windows.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The initial g is part of geansaí ; it wasn’t put there for any grammatical reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominicCol12

"He is wearing a jumper" was not accepted yet earlier "I am wearing a jumper" "Ta geansai orm" was accepted Note also "jumper" rather than "sweater" was used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Tá geansaí aige does not mean that he’s wearing a sweater; it only means that he has one. “Jumper” vs. “sweater” are merely dialectal variants, like “flat” vs. “apartment”.

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