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"You have tried to go."

Translation:Ustedes han tratado de ir.

0
5 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bcoz14

why do you need "de" before "ir" but you don't need "de" before "comer" in a similar sentence?

12
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/axl.c

as Babella has said: "de" does not go with "ir" in this sentence, but with "tratado"

haber tratado de + INF = having tried to + INF

34
Reply44 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oowowaee

I am not sure if this was covered in the infinitives section or not, but it's one of those constructions:

tratar de + INF = to try to ...

ie, trato de decir, I try to say/I am trying to say...

8
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JillianMelissita

That is helpful, thanks

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

As said in other comments, the de doesn't go with the ir but rather following tratar:

http://www.cliffsnotes.com/foreign-languages/spanish/spanish-i/prepositions/preposition-use-with-verbs

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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"Has intentado ir" was accepted.

5
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anthonyinsanity

difference between "has tratado de ir" and "has tratado ir"? is one colliquial?

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

No, "has tratado ir" is incorrect.

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hmoore3

Why?

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Because the verb needs the preposition, same as "try" needs a "to", you cannot say "try go" and it works the same way in Spanish with some verbs, "tratar" (when it translates as "try") goes with "de" :]

18
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bcoz14

but ir means "to go" which is why I thought "has tratado ir" should work. In another lesson, "Yo he sabido comer" was correct...no "de"

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

But "de" does not go with "ir" or "comer", it goes with "tratar": tratar de/try to. That is why you do not need "de" after "saber".

You try to eat / Tú tratas de comer.

5
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Hello Babella; Do they use "DE" rather than "A" here because " a ir" has the two vowels together type rule violated?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Hi! No, it is just that "tratar de" = "try to". The preposition goes with the verb in this case ^^ Another verb to express the same is "intentar", and this one needs no preposition: has intentando ir.

3
14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

To Balella: I couldn't respond directly to you for some reason. Once again you are a bunch of help. A quick question; when you are using a particple and following with a verb do you ever need a "connector"(I forget what it's called) like "A" or "DE" ? BTW a lingot for your patience and help. Thanks for being there.

0
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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I am not sure how old this post is but please check above. Scroll up there are several sites that give lists of verbs that require prepositions and which ones are given with them.

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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leesalpietro

Hello! Could someone please tell me why I was marked wrong for "Has intentado de ir" ?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emperor_Anj_Ru

So a correct translation would have been "Has tratado de ir" ?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Yes :]

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NinjaCate

It's telling me has probado ir, which i guess makes sense by why abandon tratar the verb entirely?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I don't think probar makes sense here AT ALL. Intentar, or tratar de. "Probar" is like "to test, to sample, to try, to taste". You could saying something like, "You tried going," -- where we've previously established what it was you would've been going to, and you tried that thing out to see if you liked it. But "You tried to go" is pretty clearly the "attempt" type of "try", and that is definitively NOT probar.

(It gave me that as a translation as well, and I reported it as wrong.)

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I do not know why, but "has tratado de ir" is as correct! I think it would be "has probado a ir", by the way?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I'm pretty sure that if you were going to ask something like, "Have you tried skiing?", well, first of all, it would be more common to just use a noun to describe the activity -- ¿Has probado el esquí? -- but if you insisted on using a verb, it would just be the bare infinitive -- ¿Has probado esquiar? Probar generally is transitive ( http://www.spanishcentral.com/translate/probar ). It takes an object noun phrase. And when you want to let a verb take the place of an NP, and represent an activity in abstract, you just use the infinitive. For instance, an answer to that question could be: Sí, a mí me gusta mucho esquiar.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FraserMcFadyen

¿Y si pongo marcharse?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tan10sha
tan10sha
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Would 'irse' also work here?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LushlyLizzy
LushlyLizzy
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Why can't i just put, "ustedes tener intentado a ir"?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
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You need to translate the auxilary verb to create the past tense.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottsimons

Why not "tu has tratado de ir"? How am I suppose to know if it's a singular or multiple "you"?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LawrenceHolder

why not: usted ha tratado a ir

0
Reply7 months ago