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  5. "Hun er i et ægteskab."

"Hun er i et ægteskab."

Translation:She is in a marriage.

August 31, 2014

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malloryraymond

is this the same meaning as "she is married"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb

"Hun er gift" would be "she is married", which although means pretty much the same thing, I would say whether it should be accepted or not is debatable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PushythePirate1

I put 'she is married' because it sounded better in English than 'she is in a marriage' and it marked it correct (7/18).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

If they mean the same thing it should be accepted IMHO. It's a lot more natural to say "she is married" than "she is in a marriage" in English. Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clayh

Not exactly the same though...

Consider the difference in "Jeg er gift" ("I'm married") vs. "Jeg er i et [godt/dårligt] ægteskab" (I'm in a [good/bad] marriage").

I'm sure someone can explain better than I can the context in which you would use one or the other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malloryraymond

In that usage, the good/bad, it makes sense. But just saying I am in a marriage would practically never be said in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaquesCroi

Could be a new facebook status...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasperHorn

Nope, still not common English. The better translation in that case would be "my marriage is good" or better yet "I'm happily married".

Getting the highest number of words to be literal translations doesn't equal the best translation (and sometimes not even "a good translation")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melissa721739

We're not learning English, so to me it should be whatever translation most accurately captures the Danish even at the cost of what is most natural in English. And trying to find some perfect translation of the Danish into English will eventually be a hindrance to gaining fluency. You have to engage with the language on its own terms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WildSage

That's not the same and that isn't the vocabulary they are teaching in this exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

This is funny because "Gift" in German (same pronunciation as in English) means "toxic".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xolesliexo

So is "Hun er gift"a more acceptable way of saying it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tddk

Not more acceptable, but far more common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sll-ttt

People should translate what is written or said, and not write a novel in proper english from each sentence. Then they would learn much faster. As long as you think in english you learn only english. I don't care what it means in english. The girls is in a marriage, this is what is written and this is what I translate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxelGrove

By no dane would ever say that without some qualification of the marriage (new, bad). It makes no sense teaching a sentence nobody would ever use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_Sesquipedalian

This is not a natural sentence in English. It would make more sense to describe the woman as being married.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

I checked the etymology of this word and it's rather interesting.

"ægte" means "real" (compare to German or Dutch "echt") and the ending "-skab" corresponds to the English "-ship" as in "friendship" for example.

So literally it is a "realship".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NelLen14

It gave me "She is at a marriage" as wrong. Isn't "i: in, of, at"? Being in marriage means married. Being at a marriage means being at a wedding. How to say the latter instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dovbear57

I don't know the answer to your question NelLen, I'm just adding this comment in the hope that somebody will tell us. HOW DO YOU SAY "She is at a wedding" IN DANISH, SOMEBODY, PLEASE?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FabianRxse

I don't get the meaning of this sentence. can anyone explain, please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colettekleemann

means written on a contract? while "gift" has to do with "given"? I prefer to be on a contract!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claujaviteam

Why not wedding?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NelLen14

"She is in a wedding" was given as wrong to me. Then I looked up 'wedding' and I found 'bryllup: wedding, marriage'. So 'bryllup' can mean both. But not 'ægteskab', why not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidLamb53073

A wedding in English refers to the ceremony at which the couple become married. Once they are married, we don't say that they are in a wedding, but in a marriage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LNE_fishy

This sentence is such garbage. I have never heard anyone say "I am going to a marriage", so frustrating having to memorise this just to not make mistakes.


[deactivated user]

    People do say "she is in a bad marriage".

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