"Dé Luain go Dé hAoine."

Translation:On Monday to Friday.

4 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LeMaitre
LeMaitre
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What's the difference between "Dé Luain" and "Luan"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UaSirideain

Luan = Monday; an Luan = on (the) Monday; Dé Luain = day of Monday

Typically, in Irish, you wouldn't say "Luan" on it's own. You'd either use "an Luan" in a general sense, or "Dé Luain" when referring to a specific Monday.

Imrím iománaíocht ar an Luan = I play hurling on (a given) Monday; bhí mé ag imirt iománaíocht Dé Luain = I was playing hurling on Monday.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValaCZE
ValaCZE
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in Tips & notes is written that "h" before words which begin with a wowel means that the word is in plural. So shouldn't "Dé hAoine" mean fridays instead friday?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nithuigim

Not quite. The lesson says that if a plural word begins with a vowel you have to add the "h" because you will be using "na" instead of "an." For example, úll = apple, an úll = the apple, úlla = apples, na húlla = the apples. The word is already plural because of the plural marker that comes at the end of the word. You put the "h" on the front because the article changing from "an" to "na" means you have a word that begins with a vowel following a word that ends with a vowel (why that doesn't apply in the masculine possessive is over my head ag an am seo - along with a lot of other things...)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chewbacca4213

Here is an interesting explanation on why the initial mutations exist in the forms that they do. http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/sindos.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnClayborn
JohnClayborn
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This doesn't make sense to me. Why are we ignoring the second "dé"? Someone already said that in Irish they don't say the day of the week by itself and include an article, like "Dé", but wouldn't that just make this "Monday to Friday"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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isn’t an article — it’s the genitive form of dia, a literary word for “day”. The form with can be used either as a noun or as an adverb (like English “The shop is open (on) Sunday”, where “Sunday” is an adverb whether “on” is present or not), so this exercise could be translated as either “Monday to Friday” or “On Monday to Friday”.

“Monday to Friday” is now (2015-05-16) accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnClayborn
JohnClayborn
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Ah. Go raibh maith agat. I haven't progressed to genitive forms yet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dar...
Dar...
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Also can mean God(s) too. Dia thú (God bless you), Tuath Dé (Laity of God(s)), Tuatha Dé Danaan (Laity of the God(ess?) Dana), and it's the God part of 'God be with you' in dia duit (hello) etc.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Not necessarily the same word

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dar...
Dar...
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That's right, it's debatable.

You might like this:- https://ansionnachfionn.com/seanchas-mythology/tuatha-de-danann/

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Same spelling but different meanings.
Dinneen gives the following:

andiu (indiu), adv., today. See dia and indiu.

aniu, aniudh, aniugh (indiu), today. See dia.

bárach, m., tomorrow; i mbárach, tomorrow; ar maidin i mbárach, next morning; lá ar n-a bhárach, on the morrow; ar n-a bhárach, on the morrow (Kea., F. F.); ó 'ndiu go dtí i mbárach, from today till tomorrow, from day to day. (The nom. bárach is not now used; the first syllable in the oblique cases is pron. mbáir.)

dia, m., a day, in phrs., dia Domhnaigh, on Sunday; d. Luain, on Monday; d. Máirt, on Tuesday; d. Céadaoin', on Wednesday; d. Dhardaoine (contr. to Dia'rdaoin), on Thursday; d. hAoine, on Friday; d. Sathairn, on Saturday; i ndiu, today; i ndé, yesterday; arughadh i ndé, the day before yesterday.

diu, temp. abl. of dia, a day, in phr. i ndiu, a ndiu (aniu, indiu, aniudh), today, now. See dia.

dia, g. dé, d. dia, voc. a dhé and a dhia, pl. dée and déithe, g. pl. dia and déitheadh, d. pl. déibh and déithibh, voc. pl. a dhée and a dhéithe, m., God, a god; Dia dhuit, God save you! Dia 's Muire dhuit, God and Mary save you! Dia linn, God help us! is toil le Dia or is é toil Dé, it is God's will.

g. = genitive, d. = dative, voc. = vocative

Dia = day has its counterpart in Welsh - dydd,
dydd Llun = Monday, ddydd Llun = on Monday.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bastianacook

I don't know, but Monday to Friday is accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnClayborn
JohnClayborn
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Strange. it marked me wrong when I put 'Monday to Friday'. Perhaps they've fixed that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Is it not more common in Irish to say "ó Luan go hAoine" instead.

e.g. "Bíonn na bainc ar oscailt ó Luan go hAoine."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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That would be “From Monday to Friday”.

Note that it would be Luan rather than Luain, since Luain is the genitive form.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Thanks for pointing this out. I have now corrected it so as not to continue misleading others.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leighfy7
Leighfy7
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does this not translate as "Monday thru Friday"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeMelosh
MikeMelosh
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I thought so, too, since "On Monday to Friday" makes no sense to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irishqueen123

my answer was correct i looked it up a lot and now i am stuck on that problem

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mascha53
mascha53
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This English is strange. I think it should be "From Monday to Friday". Or else "On Monday or Friday". We don't combine "on" with "to".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dar...
Dar...
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I would combine "on" with "to", and "from" with "to", but I'm very unlikely to use "through" unless combined with "to" and preceded by "on". None of these are strange though. They're all used extensively by different dialects of English; Eg. I suspect an American might favour "thru" over "through to" or any other variant.

What I find strange is that it's taken over fifty years for me to spot that i in Dé Luain.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josefderry

Why are there so many different pronounciations of ''de'' ?

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Why are you asking about the pronunciation of de (without a fada) on an exercise that uses the completely different word (with a fada)?

Fadas aren't just for decoration!

5 days ago
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