"Volendo, c'è anche il posto per un ospite."

Translation:If you want, there is even room for a guest.

May 27, 2013

33 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandon376

"If you wanted to" as a translation for "volendo" is tough for me to figure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrule

I imagine it as "wanting, there is even room for a guest". This doesn't translate perfectly, but you can think of "wanting" as short for "if you are wanting" i.e. "if you want".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tikidog

There's also one other sentence in this section where the word "volendo" is used to mean "if you want." It must be somewhat idiomatic.

http://www.duolingo.com/comment/505537


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dieuwkeH

Why is it 'if you want', and not 'if we want' or 'if I want'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Munjo
  • 1013

That's what I wanted to ask!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lodoviko

Even though in Italian it does say "il posto," in English, it would be rendered with the indefinite article "a."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carpelanam

Introducing a sentence with a gerund this way is a remnant of the Latin "ablative absolute," a construction which is highly flexible. It's often best rendered into English with a temporal or other clause. It would be really hard to cover every possible variant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kayamel

I put a generic "if wanted" and it was refused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

I don't see why that is not as good as the DL translation with "If YOU" - here's hoping that someone from DL will pass this way eventually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnDevo

Does "c'e`anche" always mean "there is even" - can it not also mean "there is also"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jlco

If you want there is even place for a guest is not English. Don't know what language that might be- Martian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrule

"if you want, there is even room for a guest"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy_Dufresne

the answer rejects "a place for a guest"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Munjo
  • 1013

"a place for a guest" is accepted now (10 Nov, 2014)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xtrodanaire

Wanting,translation for volendo where on earth do you fit " if you want "?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

"There is even room for a guest" - that part I can understand. It's how you would render "volendo" into decent English that I have trouble with. But will DL please note that "If needed to" is utter rubbish! Reported 28.2.15


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rizzo56

The dictionary hints on hover are wrong or missing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tash_87

A place for "a" guest!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob676803

"if one wants" is an equivalent translation that keeps the impessoal character of "vogliendo". But my guess is that a native speaker would say something like "with good will", a better translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregHullender

As others have said, volendo generally means "if X wants" where X will be clear from context.

I'm puzzled that il posto can mean "room". Wordreference shows posto alone with that meaning, it seem to me that this really needs to be "a place" or "a room."

Reported 2014-07-11 17:50 UTC


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

But there is no context. So like others I don't see why it could not be, if THEY want or whatever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregHullender

Agreed. "If they want, there's also the guest room" seems a fine translation to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

Why "guest room"? One one could argue that "posto" in this case could be a place at a table.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelGit4

you keep on changing the f---ing meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaNordin

How does one know who is wanting???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna295568

It seems to me that "volendo" in this context, is just an idiomatic expression, an impersonal gap filler (without significant meaning) which makes me think of the equivalent in English "If you will". Could an Italian please confirm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan740070

So with the ending of present progressive verbs, how do you indicate if the speakers refers to you/he/them etc. like in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

The ending on the verb says nothing about the (direct/indirect) object.
If you mean the subject, the sentence is intentionally impersonal so the subject is unspecified.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nitzanms1

Why un ospite and not un'ospite?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

un ospite = a (male) guest
un'ospite = a (female) guest

un is used with masculine words (not connected to the actual gender the word refers to). -> un ragazzo, un uomo, un fiume.
un' is used with feminine words starting with a vowel. -> un'amica, un'ora, un'isola.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PorthosFlu

A, how you say, "guest room"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeeDeeAcq

Why not ¨a place for a guest¨?........sometimes, DL is SO random. It feels like that could be a correct answer, but bc DL doesn´t LIKE it, it gets marked incorrect!!!!! I HATE THAT about this app!!!

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.