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"He has foreseen it all."

Translation:Lo ha previsto todo.

5 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ahgmem
ahgmem
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why is it not: Él ha previsto todo ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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You could say Él lo ha previsto todo. Él is the subject and lo is the direct object. You don't need él here, of course; it's redundant.

The lo is also redundant with todo but you actually do need it. Normally you don't use a redundant direct object pronoun unless the direct object comes in front of the verb, but todo is a special case. You always have to use a lo when the object is todo.

A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish: Fifth Edition (Butt and Benjamin, 2011, section 11.16.4 "Redundant Object pronouns")

Come to think of it, English sort of does this too, doesn't it? We say "he has forseen it all"; just saying "he has forseen all" sounds like something a fortune teller with bad English might say.

So if you want to (as a memory aid), it's probably okay to think of the "lo" as corresponding to the "it" in "it all."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheNO237

I appreciate the explanation, but I got it right with "Él ha previsto todo." Why didn't I need the "lo?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LowlandPhilomath

It seems that todo is just a strange exception. At a different sentence, it was also mentioned that officially you have to use lo with todo; however at that specific sentence, duolingo actually disallowed it.

So I guess this is just an example of a language being on the move.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlokken

I did not get it right. Was getting message I need Lo

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariajosegrech

You are right, but when people are speaking sometimes emphasize the sentence with redundant words, so "él lo ha previsto todo", "él ha previsto todo ello", "ha previsto todo" are right translations of this sentence too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lily3

You need the direct object "it" in the Spanish sentence. "Él ha previsto todo" = He has foreseen all. "Lo ha previsto todo" = He has foreseen it all.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trumprefugee

Why not Él ha previsto lo todo ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elmanisero777

i had the same question, dont know why but it sounds more natural to me that way

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Prever is an irregular. Works the same way VER does.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikerai

"Él ha previsto todo" is right!!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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I thought so too, but it isn't. See explanation by GregHullender.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dberthold

In another version of this sentence due translated todo as either "everything" or "it all." So why is "lo" needed at all?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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See explanation by GregHullender

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cyberdoctor
cyberdoctor
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What is the root verb of previsto?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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prever. Conjugated like ver

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muba3
muba3
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Is really "El lo ha todo previsto" wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkayda
kkayda
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Perhaps the difficulty here is about translating EXACTLY?
Ha previsto todo = he/she/it has foreseen everything/all Lo ha previsto todo = he/she/it has forseseen IT all Just a thought.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LWSChristlover
LWSChristlover
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"Lo ha previsto todo." And "Él lo ha previsto todo." Are both correct (strangely) And if you wanted to say "He has foreseen all." You would say "Él ha previsto todo." But you would at the "Lo" behind the "ha" to make the word "it" be in here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EaterofPumkin
EaterofPumkin
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Somehow i remembered to use "lo" with "todo", i guess ive been learnin'!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pedro.Ronaldo

Couldn't "ha lo previsto todo" also mean "she has seen it all"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkayda
kkayda
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I do not think so, Pedro. That would be "ha lo visto todo". Previstar means to look ahead to the future, predict, or anticipate. It is not about actually using your sense of sight using your phyiscal eyes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohanVanderbalij

The word order is wrong in "ha lo visto todo", it can only be "lo ha". Also, "previstar" does not exist, it's: "prever". (This information comes from my Spanish-speaking friend sitting next to me).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkayda
kkayda
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My apologies to all. You are, of course, correct on both Spanish errors. However, my comment with regards to the meaning of sentence in English is still valid. Prevar does not refer to physical seeing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HWL1223

why not: el ha previstolo todo

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You cannot tack object pronouns at the end of participio forms. That only works with infinitives (Puede preverlo), gerundio forms (Está previéndolo), and imperatives (¡Prevelo!)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carol870492

How do you know it's a he without the él; still don't understand how lo is used.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Without the él it could also be a she or a you. Context will make it clear most of the time.

Lo is always used if you have a masculine or non-gendered direct object in your sentence - which in English is most often "him" or "it" that appears right after the verb: I see him. - Lo veo.

Usually if you mention the object by name, though, you remove the lo again: I see Carlos. - Veo a Carlos.

But todo is a bit of a special object. Even though you mention it by name, you still need the lo, as long as you're not speaking colloquially.

4 months ago