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"Kvinden tager afsted."

Translation:The woman leaves.

4 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mgeisler

The pronunciation of "afsted" is a little off here. The stress would be put on the second syllable: afSTED.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trevro
trevro
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Does this mean that the "d" at the end would be pronounced, or would it still be elided?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgeisler

The "d" at the end is pronounced and the computer voice does a good job at it here.

But Danish is a funny language and I can understand if it doesn't sound pronounced to you. However, having the "d" makes a difference -- I would read the fictional word "afste" with stronger stress on the "e", and so the "d" serves to moderate the vowel before.

In other words, there is an aspect of look-ahead in the Danish language. Better examples would be "lige" (straight or just) and "ligge" (lie down) where the "gg" in the latter word makes the "i" vowel short. You can hear the difference on http://www.ivona.com/.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trevro
trevro
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Tak!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabejosh
gabejosh
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unfortunately Ivona was taken over by Amazon... bye-bye free speech.. (pun intended) :)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Idraote

Is "tager" really pronounced as "taah"? I'd expected something like "tahwer".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgeisler

Yeah, tager is pronounced as tar in normal spoken Danish and the computer voice is not too far off here. Infact, you'll sometimes see it written as ta'r when the text refers to something someone said. The apostrophe is used like in English to mark that some letters have been left out.

It's a kind of slang and quite colloquial Danish — unlike in English where it's a normal practice. We don't have many words that get this treatment, others that come to mind is hva' (hvad), ska' (skal), ha' (have), ik' (ikke).

So you might read Hej, hva' ska' du ha'? in a novel, meaning Hi, what do you want/need? (a shop assistant in a bakery could greet you like this).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Timmy_The_Kid

What does this literally mean?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cowlowl
cowlowl
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Taking leave. I guess could also be taking off :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Markmcopc
Markmcopc
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Takes off?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
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taking off is commonly used in the us to mean leaving. some times it is shortened to off: I'm taking off. I'm off.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Falatkhe
Falatkhe
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Shouldn't "the woman is leaving" be accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jnwulff

Yes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrey420

Why can't she just "afsted" without "tager"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jnwulff

Afsted is an adverb. Without tager there is no verb

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoMikhail

Why is the sentence "The woman is taking leave " wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
jamesjiao
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That would mean something else in English. It woukd mean the woman is asking her boss for days off work for vacation for example.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zeburus

i heard it like AW STEL

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Enricomaria7

Me too, i think "AF-" is read "AW-" About the "-D" it's quite common in Danish to read it like an "-L" for istance: skidpadder ( =turtles, where each "D" is read as "L")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Indra927477
Indra927477
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I have a German background (not native) so the first thing that came to my mind was "Abstand nehmen" which has a different meaning then leaving. How would be på dansk "to keep a distance" then?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucas97628

To keep a distance = at holde afstand

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mathewgk

the woman takes leave. ( of you /them/us/wherever she is at point in time) think this would be the closest translation in engelsk... at least olde english. john donne for example ...:). just wondering if its only me that thinks this way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WhiskeyTuesday

Tell me about it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xenoph2

"tager afsted" = "going outside"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YolandeCon1

so is this "tager" meaning taken without permission vs "tager afsted" - leaving in free will?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xahnas
Xahnas
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For Dutch speakers, this could be a good 'ezelsbruggetje', (=mnemonic) : 'Tager afsted' kind of looks like the Dutch (literally) : 'Nemen afstand' So 'afstand nemen' Translated into English, this means: 'to take distance'. I hope this helps in any way!

(Disclaimer) I don't know if 'afsted' and 'afstand' are valid cognates. This just helps me remember the word and I'm just sharing my ezelsbruggetje.

7 months ago