"Wij durven in het grote, oude en lege gebouw te slapen."

Translation:We dare to sleep in the big, old and empty building.

4 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mullac1992
mullac1992
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This sentence scares me. In both subject matter and length.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rsharyon

It felt really satisfying to get this one right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MirkoAnte
MirkoAnte
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durven is totally not dürfen in german, am I right? confused for weeks now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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No not at all, the German dürfen = mogen

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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and the Dutch "durven" seems to often be "es wagen" or "sich trauen" in German. http://en.pons.com/translate?q=durven

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demensspinster

These are attributive adjectives, so why the commas and the "and"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louis.vang
louis.vang
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In Flemish and i think also in Dutch you have only one adjective, without "and" or comma. When you have more than one adjective, you have to use the comma and the word "and" between the two last adjectives.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demensspinster

Sure, that's why I said "I'm referring to the English translation" which doesn't need any of that and still failed me. It has now been fixed though, I believe ...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dideler

In English the commas can be used here (they're actually missing one before "and" to nitpick), though you can also not use them (e.g "in the big old empty building").

Duolingo often doesn't support all correct translations, which is mostly obvious when you try to test out without going through their exercises first to know what specific translations they're expecting. In that case just report it by hitting the flag icon.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcuslangford

The comma before the "and" is optional, but I agree, it is a list of properties (based on the and) and needs the commas, if it didn't have the "and" no commas would be required.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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The comma before "and" is the Oxford comma, which I usen't like, but now I do.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demensspinster

I'm referring to the English translation...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReyW4
ReyW4
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if 'gebouw' is a het word, howcome all the adjectives end with -e?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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Because 'het' is still in front of it:

  • De oude bank
  • Een oude bank
  • Het oude gebouw
  • Een oud gebouw
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lindwurm
Lindwurm
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Why can't we use the serial comma format instead?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amelite
Amelite
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I actually type my answers in with no punctuation whatsoever and it doesn't matter. I also don't use any capitalization, except in German, where Duolingo requires capitalization of nouns.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dideler

It should. If it doesn't, it should be reported.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyptoalexi
Kyptoalexi
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Duolingo doesn't care about capitalisation of nouns in German. Only sometimes will it point it out, but not count it against you. Like one time out of a hundred

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathancrazyj

could durven be used in the same way that Dare can be used in English in the sentence: "I dare you to..." as a challenge?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Regarding your question -- uitdagen or (zich) wagen would be more usual. The latter (wagen) can have similarities to durven -- as in the contexts of "Wij durven in het grote, oude en lege gebouw te slapen." -- as well as uses such as, "We dare not go there." or "He wouldn't dare think of saying that." etcetera.

Additionally, wagen (not used as a reflexive verb) can be used when 'issuing a dare/challenge to someone, but uitdagen is probably more usual/common in this case:

  • Waag het eens. -- "I dare you to."

  • Ik daag je uit om het te proberen. -- "I dare you to try (it)."

Wagen can also be used to mean "to risk, wager":

  • je geld/leven wagen aan ... -- "to risk your money/life on ..."

The reflexive form zich wagen means to venture in a 'hazardous' manner -- such as venturing onto a frozen body of water or through a dangerous area.

  • zich op het ijs wagen -- "to venture onto the ice"

  • Hij waagt zich op het ijs. -- "He ventures/is venturing on(to) the ice."

  • de sprong wagen -- "to take the plunge" (e.g. to jump into water that may be cold or filled with hazards) -- or it could be used more figuratively:

  • zijn kans wagen -- "to try one's luck/fortune"

  • een poging wagen -- "to have a go/shot/try at something; to give it/something a try."

  • Waag het niet om te lachen! -- "Don't you dare laugh!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SchonBaume

Why lege and not leeg?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_rxlinguist
_rxlinguist
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I was really thrilled with myself for getting this one right the first time. Ouff.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertEddy
RobertEddyPlus
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I suggest 'vacant' as an appropriate translation of 'lege' - Aren't unoccupied buildings vacant and not empty?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
feyMorgaina
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I think "vacant" and "empty" have different meanings in the context here.

"Vacant" implies a continuous state of not having any occupancy (such as, not having tenants). (E.g. The apartment building has a vacant suite. The management is looking for more tenants)

"Empty" refers to the state of the building at the current moment ( and it is not necessarily known if an empty building has tenants that may return later). (E.g. An empty warehouse is often a good temporary shelter for the homeless for a night)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I think empty has a further slight connotation of abandoned. The buildings in a ghost town are empty, not vacant, no one expects to ever occupy them again.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zalmoksis

Is it the correct order of adjectives for English? Shouldn't it be more like "empty big old building"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThomPlus
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Adjective order matters a great deal in English, but the order follows a usage rule that we're never actively taught: it's learned passively.

Opinion, size, age, shape, color, origin, material, purpose noun.

We can talk about the big, green, Argentinian dragon in no other order. That is, the green, Argentinian, big dragon hits a thud on our ears. Winnie the Pooh is a silly old bear. He can't be an old silly bear.

I would like to borrow your new, green, German, touring car, please.

And the best example I've seen published: a lovely little old rectangular green French silver whittling knife.

"A little rectangular old French lovely whittling silver green knife" sounds ridiculous.

We don't even know that we do it. Nobody ever taught us to do it. But we always do it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnJester1

In English the order of the descriptors doesn't matter very much. You would use it to place emphasis on whichever one you felt was important. I don't agree with what they say is correct here has there is no means to evaluate which is important. I place empty first and it said it was wrong. I find many similar issues where at least in American English the order has had no bearing on meaning in many sentences.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raslc
Raslc
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Quick question... Why is it 'het' instead of 'de'... If im not mistaken, gebouw is a 'de' noun, isn't?

And even if it is not, then why would it be 'grote' and 'oude' and 'lege' instead of their forms without 'e'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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  • Het gebouw - het oude gebouw - een oud gebouw
1 year ago
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