"C'est une prise."

Translation:This is an outlet.

May 28, 2013

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arya.Stark

British: socket/wall socket Australian: power point American: outlet/power outlet/electrical outlet/plug (incorrect but common) Canadian: as above, but pronounced "ewt-let" or "oat-let" instead :D

February 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

In French, we play it simple by using the same word for the male or female side of the connection: une prise.

February 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nacho.Danders

I've also seen the male side referred to as a fiche. Is that a regional thing?

November 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uyterschout

No, it's not a regional thing, see: http://www.cnrtl.fr/definition/fiche [e) ÉLECTR. Fiche mâle]

March 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rickjmill

The only time a gender is needed is when asking for an adapter: "Do you guys have a male USD - female microUSD adapter?"

June 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ripcurlgirl

Out of curiosity, would "This / it is a plug" be accepted here as well SS? It did accept "It is a socket".

PS Thanks for the heads-up on the pronunciation below - so phonetically (en anglais) it sounds like "preez" - j'ai raison ?

October 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Yes, because in French "une prise" can be a plug /socket / outlet / power point (male or female connection).

Oui, tu as raison, "preez" is the correct pronunciation.

October 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JazzyFrench

Receptacle is the technical term in the USA but no one uses it except for electricians.

May 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JewishPolyglot

I'm sure it's a big surprise for anyone from the same hemisphere as the US to arrive in France and other European countries (+ Israel) and see that outlets consist of a pair of round holes instead of parallel slits

June 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gibsonastu

Receptacle is used in Canada too and not just by Electricians. This is what is labelled on the box when you buy one - it will not be labelled a plug! The plug is really the part at the end of the cord that you put into the receptacle (ie you plug the plug into the outlet/receptacle). Socket is also used.

December 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JazzyFrench

Yes, but everyday folks in America would not use ordinarily the term receptacle, while electricians do so exclusively --that is really my point.

I did not comment on this but basically we would say outlet or socket.

BTW: Not many folks will buy a receptacle unless you have already some electrician skills so they would never see the label on the box.

March 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gibsonastu

Canada is part of North America last time I checked. I guess I don't hang out with everyday folks.... Receptacle is commonly used, not just by electricians, and would be understood by anyone I know...it's not rocket science to use the more correct word for the female part!

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob550656

It would be comedy genius if you had used "socket science" here instead

August 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thecasualzombie

I'm British and I call both the male and female side the plug (which is technically incorrect)

February 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteffieSproat

Being British, I had to look here to make sense of it. I've never heard of a wall socket being called an outlet.

February 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Summerstor5

I don't know where that came from or when it began, but you're right that it doesn't make much sense. Oh, but it lets out (out let, get it) the electricity there, so you can buy it at a steep 1% discount price.

I prefer "receptacle" for the parts an electrician would use to create the finished product.

I probably use 'outlet' most of the time when I'm looking for a place to plug-in an appliance.

April 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shavonne_5

What is meant by "outlet"? That could mean many things from where I'm from, a store selling brand names for reduced price...or an electrical outlet.

May 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Considering the French translation it is an electric outlet. Note that we ususally use "une prise" both for the plug (male side) and the outlet (female side).

May 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thales-Machado

Here, in Brazil, we also say '' tomada'' for both sides.

November 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cephlin

So une prise = a power socket or a plug.

June 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoubleLingot

une prise can also mean a catch(ing), a hold, a socket point, a power point, an outlet, a grip, a taking, an intake, or a capture

March 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shlyovich

Not sure about other English speakers but in Australia I use the term 'power point'.

October 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pont

This is one of those things with a lot of regional variation -- it will probably take a few "my translation should be accepted" reports to get them all marked correct. I'd call it a mains socket or power socket.

November 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/camelsbane

unless it's a 'phone outlet or even a vacuum outlet (inlet?). Hi from Sydney, btw

March 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaTall

the question of pronunciation: I hear Pri:s; Shouldn't it be pronounced 'pri:z'. Not complaining (yet), just asking :)

November 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

PRIZ, like in "chemise" (that the voice also pronounces wrongly).

the rule is that when a single S is placed between vowels, it is pronounced Z

November 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaTall

thought so, thanx

November 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BizzLizz

In Irish/English a "plug" in inserted into a "socket". :-)

February 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NY_Beagle

Same in New York. They're two totally different things.

December 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NY_Beagle

As a native speaker of US English, an outlet and a plug are not the same thing. The plug goes into the outlet, they are opposites. So do they mean plug (the end of an electrical cord) or outlet (thing in the wall)?

December 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

French makes your life easier with the same word for both sides. If need be, we can use "une prise murale" for an outlet.

December 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NY_Beagle

Merci! Now it makes sense. Lingot given. :)

December 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandiacognac

what would the word for an "artistic" outlet be? How about a "shopping" outlet?

April 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"an outlet for young talents" = un débouché pour de jeunes talents (opportunities)

"sales outlets are promising there" = les débouchés commerciaux sont prometteurs là-bas (market)

"an outlet" = un magasin, un point de vente, un réseau commercial (point of sales/a store network)

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mobilgangsta

Why won't it accept "This is one outlet" can 'one' and 'a' be used interchangeably or is the Owl yanking me :/

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1751

Are you counting the outlets? The indefinite article "un/une" may be translated as the numeral "one" but it seems quite odd to do so here.

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/labar54

I can hear "C'est une priSSe"... like a snake. I would like a "Z" like the "s" in "thouSand".

July 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Typo3000

The voice pronounces it wrong. The general rule is that when an "S" is sandwiched by 2 vowels, it should be pronounced like a "Z". If need be, report the problem when you next encounter this sentence.

December 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sfishlock

Yet another frustrating Americanism. In these new lessons, Duolingo seems hellbent on punishing British English speakers more and more.

March 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

What's missing?

March 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sfishlock

Power point or socket should be accepted.

March 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"socket" is already accepted and I added "power point".

Just remember that this program was created by Americans to teach Am English. We have already added a number of British English variants (colour/color - have got/have) but not everywhere (and we had no Brit in the team to help us out).

The best is to report your suggested additions in the sentence forum or on one of the Mod's thread, so that we can proceed to improvements.

March 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sfishlock

Many thanks Sitesurf. Really appreciate your contributions. Understand the Am English angle, though I think the significant number of other English speakers should still be able to use it without going completely nuts. It is hard enough trying to learn French !

March 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fyggs

Memrise seems to be created by Brits, if that's helpful (could be wrong). Different approach to learning French, though. Using both helps me flesh things out and kind of "think" in French.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1751

There is one Brit on the team now. He validates whether it is genuine BrE or just someone's preferred expression.

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enothere

une prise = a socket , un prise = a plug ?

April 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

une prise is definitely feminine.

"une prise" is used for both the male & female ends.

April 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertWolfe

My French relatives in Normandy always call an electric outlet "une sortie." I guess there's more than one term for them, like they are also called a "socket" in English.

April 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thalass

As in "an electrical outlet" a "power plug" etc?

June 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1751

Yes, exactly.

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thalass

Thanks :)

October 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itkoi

I've noticed lately that "une" is sometimes pronounced with the E at the end. Is this always the case for "une", because I swear I've heard it as just "un".

October 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1751

It is the male voice which has the accent you will hear in the southwest of France. It is different but it is also correct.

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fuddiger

Hey Sitesurf, if a comment is specifically about a translation that is missing and it then gets added, would it be possible to delete the comment? Or there could be one button for questions/comments and the flag function could be used to report bugs and missing translations? Kind of annoying to sift through 50 or 60 comments that are no longer relevant when looking for info.

November 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

We try to do what you suggest but we may sometimes forget some obsolete comments. It is also annoying for us to sift through 50 or 60 comments to find what to remove.

November 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fuddiger

Which is why I suggested the idea of placing translation suggestions in the category of flagging problems, rather than in the comments and then you wouldn't have to delete them but of course you are much more involved in it than I am, just a thought.

November 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

We indeed get "users' suggestions" directly in the incubator, coming from the feature 'report a problem' you can access from every challenge page (last box on the menu).

Actually, this is our main source of suggestions for alternative translations. When we find a relevant suggestion, we add it directly into the system. This is also when we may forget to go back and check on the sentence forum thread to remove obsolete comments.

November 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorentinHa6

Fiche could be correct but I am not sure that it could be understood by everyone (it is more a technical word). To make the difference you can say "prise male" ou "prise femelle"

November 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sally410

I have never called a wall socket an outlet in my life. Try to use wall/power socket/point or "plug" (technically what is put into it) if in UK, to avoid baffled faces!

November 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRobert0

What is a plug socket ? One of the answers. It is either a plug-in or a socket

December 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRobert0

The other choice was plug outle... it can't be both...either it is a plug-in or an outlet.

December 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jordiiiP

Makes you wonder where this word originated if not from English since it's a relatively recent facility

February 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshBelchem

why could it not be "it is an outlet"?

March 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrincyLord

In Chinese, prise refers to 插座, anyway fiche is 插头.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanlucvivier

we must pronounce "priz" and not "priss"

September 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jezzaaaa

Outlet could mean anything.

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteffieSproat

I've never heard of a plug socket being called an outlet. I thought it was something to do with cut price shopping. That's what an outlet centre is in the UK.

February 23, 2018
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