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  5. "Ag an am seo."

"Ag an am seo."

Translation:At this time.

September 2, 2014

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DithBowen

Go mbeimid beo ag an am seo aris!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

Google says that means "May we be alive at this time again !"

Not quite sure what that entails/implies, but okey doke...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ailisbc

Basically happy new year, sweet thing to say at any celebration tho


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeMaitre

So it's ok if you don't put a 't-' before 'am' here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Yes. In fact, it would be wrong to put a t- there, because of the preposition ag. (The same would apply for many other prepositions.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

Is that because in "Cen t-am e?" there's an "n" with the tongue in an apical-alveolar position whereas in "ag" it's "back"/in the velar location?

Just trying to make sense of the phonology behind why what happens when. Still struggling to make sense of the stuff in https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ga/Eclipsis


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The causes for the initial mutations in Irish (including the prothetic T) can be found here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohanaSchw

because it's in the dative case? what follows ag is usually straight forward, ag+an eclipses where appropriate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohanaSchw

And ag an + vowel is the okay sequence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lethe-DFD

Would you use this as an imperative (eg. "Do it at this time" meaning "Do it now!"), as a general description (eg. "We don't have any at this time" meaning "We don't have any now, but if you come back later, we might"), or in either circumstance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Since it’s an adverbial phrase, it wouldn’t be used as an imperative. (I’d imagine that if someone intended to express the adverb “now”, anois would be used.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

I keep hearing "Egg and ham". Must be breakfast time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K4ttan

I kept hearing "ag an aimsir". At least it's Irish....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/herredave

K4ttan, it may be that your ear us used to hearing an "r" at the end if a word as simply a "coloring of the previous vowel. For example: "therefore" ['đęə foə] (no phonetic keyboard available).

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