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  5. "Ólann sí."

"Ólann sí."

Translation:She drinks.

September 2, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NordicMand

Some audio would be nice

May 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaisyJaneW

It helps me to remember this: E= he (or male tense) I=she (or female tense) Just practicing the differences between the use of the í and é have helped me so very much! I hope it helps you too!

October 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrissylilly

Just wondering, I'm also taking Rosetta Stone in Irish. For 'eat' and 'drink' so far they have only taught us (as an example): Ta an fear ag ithe and Ta an bean ag ol. Are 'to eat' and 'to drink' always conjugated?

September 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

So Irish is more like English in this regard that, say, Spanish.

What Duolingo is teaching you is the present simple and the present habitual tense. It's for things you do regularly (The woman drinks, for example). The version Rosetta Stone is using is the present progressive, and it is used in the same sense that English uses it.

Itheann an fear - The man eats

Tá an fear ag ithe _ The man is eating

Ólann an bhean - The woman drinks

Tá an bhean ag ól - The woman is drinking

September 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrissylilly

aha okay, so can both be used when speaking, they're just used in different instances?

September 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yep.

September 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tea21312

How many tenses does irish have?

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OnkelD
  • 1616

Did the audio go out? I often try to go here to hear how these sentences sound. (I know about the dialects--same thing for Norwegian) I just would like hearing one of them... Being a "Shannon" by name, I presume the western dialect is spoken in that region.

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrunnoHC

Is there a reason to the use of two 'N's in "ólann" here? (Pronunciation (slender vs. broad?), gemination...) (Obs. it's just a question. I simply don't know why. Can someone explain me, please?)

January 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caitlin301034

I'm very new to this and I just wanted to ask one question: is this course good? I want to learn Irish outside of school but don't really want to buy a course. Is there anyone here who knows Irish well enough to say how good this course is?

February 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

This course is a fabulous resource! You will not become fluent, nyt you will learn enough to move on with a great basis. Done It!

October 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Holly198834

I'm missing something. How am I supposed to know the vocabulary when it's introduced? "Drink" wasn't a work I'd seen anywhere so translating it impossible for me.

May 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caitlin301034

When you get to a new word, it should be coloured yellow. Hover over it with your mouse (or tap it if you're on mobile) and the definition should come up. You can do this even when the words is not yellow (you've seen it before) but I'd recommend not to do that. Hope this helps!

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ronny35190

what's the difference between ólann sí and ólaim sí?

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

the first is right and the second is wrong. "Ólaim" is "I drink" and that would translate to "I drink she", which does not make sense.

January 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynne203135

So when I clicked on the words to see what their meanings were, they both said "she drinks". I'm a little confused about that. How can 2 words have the same meaning?

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuthJohnston1

She is drinking?

April 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adilyn13

idk??? i put she is drinking and it counted it wrong!!!! ;(

August 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Read this page galasyrocker explains it.

January 23, 2017
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