https://www.duolingo.com/lawrence2507

Advogado Pronunciation

Hey Guys! I thought that in portuguese, the letter "d" is pronounced like a standard "d", except when followed by an "i" or when followed by an "e" ending a word. In those cases, it is pronounced like sn english "j". ex/ diferença, atividade. Though, in the word advogado, the robot voice pronounces the "d" like a "j". Why is this? Is or isn't it correct? Thanks!!

May 28, 2013

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

Yeah. Its like "j" because it would be like this: adivogado. So, you have the "i" after the letter d. But you cant pronounce it with a long "i" cause its not there. Then, the intonation is on "a", and after the sound "d" as it was followed by the letter "i" (just dont forget there is no i, so its sound is very slight....) ./ÁDiVOGÁDO/.... Got it?

May 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lawrence2507

Thanks Paulenrique! I still have a question, though. Why is there an invisible "i" in advogado? Is it a general rule for all words with a "v" after a "d"? Or is it something special for this one word?

May 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

That happens when we have a consonant cluster. Examples: psicologia = /pisicologia/; opção =/opição/; cacto = /cáquito/ (to keep the "k" sound)

May 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lawrence2507

Ok... I get it now. So, does this always apply to hard consonant clusters? Just to double check, it doesn't apply to soft consonant clusters, right? By that I mean consonants that you can voice, such as "s" are soft, while consonants like "t" are hard. Like in "nosso" there is a soft consonant cluster. (The double s there is just to preserve the sound) Thanks!!! Sorry for being so inquisitive. Also, so you have any relavent examples where this concept affects pronunciation of consonants other than in advogado?

May 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

Yes... ps, ct, dv, without a vowel in the middle is hard to pronunciate... so, lets add i. Others we have the phonic, like ss, sh, ch, nh, lh, rr, tr, cr, and so on... s/ss/ç sounds like s in Spanish. But s between two vowels sounds like z. So, if you write "noso" it would sound very differently from "nosso" where the s sound is kept. Also, most of time, ss or rr lets the vowel right before with a open sound. So you would say noso = nozu (first o like it is in Spanish - closed sound - and the second like "u" , but "nosso" you would say like /nóssu/ with a open o, like the o in hot)

May 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

Dont worry.... ask as much as you need ;) other examples: rapto, apto, cleptomaníaco, Pepsi, ...

May 29, 2013
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