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  5. "Is maith liom a bheith ag la…

"Is maith liom a bheith ag labhairt na Gaeilge."

Translation:I like to be speaking Irish.

September 2, 2014

12 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smrch

Re Audio - The 'g' of 'ag' should not be pronounced before a verbal noun beginning with a consonant.

September 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Indeed. At least, if you want to sound native. Which this audio doesn't.

September 2, 2014

[deactivated user]

    I really really want to translate this like a cranky old native speaker being all passive-aggressive toward English speakers: "I like to be speaking THE GAELIC"

    (And don't even make a prescriptivist fuss at me about how it's "Irish" and not "Gaelic"--Irish is the official language of Ireland, but Gaels speak THE GAELIC. And if you don't get what I mean by that, spend more time around old cranky Gaeilge/Gàidhlig speakers.)

    (I'd add Gaelg speakers in there too, but 1) there aren't many old Gaelg speakers, sadly, and 2) the few Gaelg speakers I've known have all been incredibly pleasant and agreeable.)

    August 11, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

    Me too!

    January 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/electrictrad

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but should it read "Is maith liom a bheith ag labhairt Gaeilge?"

    September 17, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    A language needs an article when referred to in a wide or general sense, and a noun governed by a verbal noun is put into the genitive, hence ag labhairt na Gaeilge.

    September 17, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/electrictrad

    I'm pretty sure my version is correct also

    March 21, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

    Most (all?) native speakers would use na Gaeilge in this situation. It's generally only non-natives who leave the article off languages (and countries, and other other abstract subjects, like stair)

    April 27, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DTSFF
    • 1066

    To me this isn't 100 % clear, because the dictionaries also have examples without an article :

    FGB here : bí » Bhí na páistí ag foghlaim Gaeilge, The children were learning Irish.

    NEID here : learn » Tá sí ag foghlaim Gaeilge, She's learning Irish.

    NEID here : Irish » Tá siad ag labhairt Gaeilge, They're speaking Irish.

    FGB here : labhair » Gaeilge a ~t, to speak Irish.

    June 25, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

    I would hesitate to use the NEID, mainly as they don't pull always pull from native speakers, but often include non-natives in their texts. The fourth one is a different structure, so wouldn't be analogous.

    The first one shows that it probably could be used, but I was reporting on my own experiences with speaking with natives.

    June 25, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

    What is wrong with 'talking' not 'speaking?'

    January 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

    Not ‘sa Gaeilge’?

    July 15, 2016
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