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  5. "Is maith liom a bheith ag la…

"Is maith liom a bheith ag labhairt na Gaeilge."

Translation:I like to be speaking Irish.

September 2, 2014

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

What is wrong with 'talking' not 'speaking?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/electrictrad

Correct me if I'm wrong, but should it read "Is maith liom a bheith ag labhairt Gaeilge?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

A language needs an article when referred to in a wide or general sense, and a noun governed by a verbal noun is put into the genitive, hence ag labhairt na Gaeilge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/electrictrad

I'm pretty sure my version is correct also


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Most (all?) native speakers would use na Gaeilge in this situation. It's generally only non-natives who leave the article off languages (and countries, and other other abstract subjects, like stair)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DTSFF
  • 1643

To me this isn't 100 % clear, because the dictionaries also have examples without an article :

FGB here : bí » Bhí na páistí ag foghlaim Gaeilge, The children were learning Irish.

NEID here : learn » Tá sí ag foghlaim Gaeilge, She's learning Irish.

NEID here : Irish » Tá siad ag labhairt Gaeilge, They're speaking Irish.

FGB here : labhair » Gaeilge a ~t, to speak Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWilkinson1

Does "Is maith liom a bheith ag labhairt na Gaeilge " mean "I like speaking Irish" or is there a subtle difference? You don't hear people in England saying "I like to be speaking Irish".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

Not ‘sa Gaeilge’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcMcDona3

That would be 'speaking in Irish' as opposed to 'speaking Irish'. Little difference in meaning, but some difference of grammar and maybe emphasis.

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