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"An gaeilgeoir."

Translation:The Irish speaker.

4 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/fr224
fr224
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Would "Hibernophone" work? Just curious.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewjeo
Rewjeo
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I believe it's Gaelophone, or something along those lines. Though I'm not sure whether or not that would also apply to the other Goidelic languages.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobhanWray

I never heard of a Gaelophone before!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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I am just a learner, but I dont think so. Hibernophone would probably refer to Hiberno-English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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I guess I never learned this in Irish class...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evaxcx

It's "Gaeilge" not "Gaelic"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianeBruce

hehe, Gaelophone. A person that speaks Scottish Gaelic is a 'Gael' (although this is debated as 'gael' translates to 'highlander' - and there is ambiguity in that can mean someone with the Gaelic language, or a geographical 'Gael' (someone living in the Highlands of Scotland or a combination of both factors. But Gaelophone is more fun!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/afroceltic

Sounds like a newspaper or magazine

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteCymru14
SteCymru14
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The Gaelic speaker?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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That's right.
Similarly:
Béarlóir - English speaker
Frainciseoir - French speaker
Breatnaiseoir - Welsh speaker
etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/modhuine

You should be far enough into the subject now to know the word gaelic is never used in english it is a non word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteCymru14
SteCymru14
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I've been learning all Celtic languages for many years now and I'm fully aware that Gaelic is more commonly afforded to describing the Celtic language of Scotland's Highlands. However, speakers in the Isle of Man are often heard referring to Gaelg as Gaelic (/ Gallick) when speaking English. Gaeilge, Gàidhlig and Gaelg all mean 'Gaelic' so why can't I get away with using it in this instance?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

For the very reason you point out: The Gaelic speaker can mean the speaker of Gaeilge, Gaelg, Gaidhlig etc. and so wouldn't specifically be a translation of 'an Gaeilgeoir'. I suppose it'd be like translating 'an Ceanadach' as 'the North American'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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I try to be specific and say Irish, Manx, or Scotch Gaelic; perhaps adding "Gaelic" to the first two if necessary, as "Gaelic" in the US usually refers to Irish, but in Canada, at least in the Maritimes, refers to Scotch Gaelic. I would also refer to the Germanic language of Scotland as "Germanic Scotch" if clarification were necessary, as it almost always is, or as "Scotch" if not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobhanWray

By Germanic Scotch do you mean Scots?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paquititismo
paquititismo
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Refuses to accept the gaelic speaker, reported

1 year ago