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  5. "An gaeilgeoir."

"An gaeilgeoir."

Translation:The Irish speaker.

September 2, 2014

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evaxcx

It's "Gaeilge" not "Gaelic"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianeBruce

hehe, Gaelophone. A person that speaks Scottish Gaelic is a 'Gael' (although this is debated as 'gael' translates to 'highlander' - and there is ambiguity in that can mean someone with the Gaelic language, or a geographical 'Gael' (someone living in the Highlands of Scotland or a combination of both factors. But Gaelophone is more fun!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustusRobi3

'Gael' generally refers to a member of the Goidelic-speaking peoples in general: Irish, Scotch, or Manx. Would 'gaeilgeoir' generally refer to Irish speakers specifically, or to speaker of Goidelic in general? What would be the Irish term to Goidelic-speakers in general? Or Celtic-speakers in general?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dimbulb

I was thinkin mebeh Hibernophone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GXLD.

I guess I never learned this in Irish class...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/afroceltic

Sounds like a newspaper or magazine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustaphaFagg

Perhaps it's just a question of style, but for me an Irish speaker is an Irish person who is speaking (whatever the language being spoken) and an Irish-speaker is a person speaking Irish, whatever country the speaker might be from. I believe Irish-speaker should at least be acceptable as an answer here, if not the preferred answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteCymru14

The Gaelic speaker?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smrch

That's right.
Similarly:
Béarlóir - English speaker
Frainciseoir - French speaker
Breatnaiseoir - Welsh speaker
etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fr224

Would "Hibernophone" work? Just curious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

I am just a learner, but I dont think so. Hibernophone would probably refer to Hiberno-English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
  • 2198

I believe it's Gaelophone, or something along those lines. Though I'm not sure whether or not that would also apply to the other Goidelic languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SiobhanWray

I never heard of a Gaelophone before!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustaphaFagg

Would these be correct? An Gearmánach gaeilgeoir, na Gearmánaigh gaeilgeora?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

If you're looking for "A German speaker of Irish", I'd say: Gaeilgeoir Gearmánach. (That is at least my two-eurocent-worth!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguist-geek

Any thoughts on "the Gaelic speaker"? I know "Gaelic" can also refer to Scottish Gaelic, but my granddad, a native Munster Gaeilge speaker, has always referred to it as "Gaelic" when speaking English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

https://www.teanglann.ie/ga/fgb/Gaeilgeoir

If your grandad was in fact a native speaker, he would never have described himself as "a Munster Gaeilge speaker".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguist-geek

No, that's not the phrase he uses to describe himself. He is from the Dingle Gaeltacht and did not speak a word of English till he was in his late teens; I specified Munster because I know the dialect differs in some ways from the standardized register. He had always referred to the language alternately as "Gaelic" and "Irish" and readily accepts both, which is why I asked. He might have chosen a different word to explain it to his American anglophone granddaughter, but again, that's why I asked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

It is true that American anglophones might prefer "the Gaelic speaker", but Irish speakers translate an Gaelgeoir as "the Irish speaker", and this course is "Irish for English speakers".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguist-geek

Thank you for the clarification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TArdy44

For me, "gaelgeoir" is a enthusiast of all things Irish - not just the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Communication is more effective when you use the same meaning for a word that everyone else does, rather than giving it your own personal definition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlDDqW

Isn't "the Irish speaker" and "the speaker of Irish" the same thing? I'm confused why I got this wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/superjackson123

Wow i remember gaeilgeoir na seachtain in 2nd class

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