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  5. "Ólann sé."

"Ólann sé."

Translation:He drinks.

September 2, 2014

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomDoyle

Well, this is an important sentence in Irish.

September 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLifeofM

Im happy to learn more about my irish culture as an O'leary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex480152

Same here. Im 99.7 percent irish. I even perfected my accent. The catch is I was born in Iowa. #lesbianwashere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArtistryHM

Same! McPherson, born in Mississippi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaStok10

Patricks here from Utah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bubba1294

Would I be able to drop the sé in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Nope. You need the in this sentence, because it's what signifies the "he".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bubba1294

Is "he" implied in the verb? Just saying "Ólann" to say "he drinks" or "she drinks" is ambiguous, but is it still grammatically incorrect? (I'm thinking about how one drops the pronoun in Spanish, e.x. "bebe" for he/she drinks.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Irish is not a pro-drop language, no. You need the pronoun to indicate who is doing the action. Dropping the pronoun (note: this doesn't happen in the and muid (and other forms, in Munster Irish) - you merely are using a synthetic form that still encodes the pronoun) is not allowed in Irish.

Saying ólann would be the equivalent of saying "drinks"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bubba1294

Alright, that makes sense. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roxanne544299

It is a big help. Thanks! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sofiadaser

I'm always thinking that sé means she


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CassandraGreer

Can it also be translated as 'he is drinking.'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeregrinaMia

No. "Ólann sé." is just "He drinks".. For example, you could say "Óleann sé usice gach lá", meaning "He drinks water every (gach) day (lá)." If you wanted to say "He is drinking", you would use the form "Tá sé ag ól."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CassandraGreer

Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerry834979

This is the third time the app has told me "Oops, that is not correct" when I've typed exactly what's been said. The correction matches what I've typed!! At first I thought maybe it was because I left out the full stop...but no!! Confused!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukaCat

What about, "Tá sé ag ól"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1227

Tá sé ag ól means "He is drinking".

In Irish and in English, the simple present (Olann sé/He drinks") and the present progressive (or present continuous) (Tá sé ag ól*/"He s drinking") are not equivlent - they have distinct meanings, and you can't translate from the simple present in English to the present progressive in Irish, or vice versa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alibax

Why is she so sad about this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bredacm

I know this is not the correct place to address this. But in the "report a problem" section there is no link for " I have lost my assist letters with fadas. How can I correct this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicoleCowan22

does he drink beer or what


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kat17311

This conveys the wrong thing.

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