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"No tienes que ser tan formal."

Translation:You do not have to be so formal.

5 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tliiv

Why isn't this estar?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klooth
klooth
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I will take a stab at this, but would love if a native speaker would weigh in. A person can be formal by nature, or dressed formally. You would address them differently. "No tienes que ser tan formal" if you want them to become a less formal person. "No tienes que estar tan formal" if you want them to put on more casual clothes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herb13
Herb13
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Klooth, I like your distinct. Also, like you, I would love for a native speaker to weigh, using your example. Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herb13
Herb13
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Geez...I like your distinction :-/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herb13
Herb13
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weigh in...I've been on this computer too long. Sorry

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Apebongo

The difference between 'ser' and 'estar' in this case is very subtle. For example, you could say "estar loco" or "ser loco" both meaning [to be crazy]. But the first case would point to the behaviour that characterizes the subject, whereas the second case implies that the craziness is intrinsic to the being of the subject.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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You're acting crazy. You're a madman.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aarms698

What is wrong with "You must not be so formal." It was marked incorrect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herb13
Herb13
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"Must not" sounds like a command. "Do not have to be" sounds like a recommendation. There's a word for classifying these, but it escapes me. All I know is that "No debe ser tan formal" is used for "must not be." Hope this helps a little. Grammarians, help me out :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZoranDuke
ZoranDukePlus
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"You must not be so formal" is actually the best translation. "You don't have to be so formal" is the literal word for word translation, but to the Spanish speaking mind, they will translate "No tienes que" to "You must not." Those who don't, come from a spanglish background. In order to say, "You don't have to," it's better to say, "It is not necessary," ie., "No es necesario que." This who example needs to be flagged and reviewed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/troy.taylor

What is the "que" here for?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Tener que = have to :]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan6742
Ryan6742
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Doesn't 'Hay que' also mean 'have to', or that 'it is necessary to'. That's what I remember learning in my Spanish classes.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Yes, "hay que" is the same, but remember that it also works with "hay". If you use other forms (he, has) you use "de" instead of "que": he de mirar allí, tengo que mirar allí = I have to look there.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

I have long thought that "hay que" meant that something should be done without stating who should do it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Yes, "hay que" is the impersonal form.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Fluent2B, that's helpful; I wouldn't have thought of an impersonal instance.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OneVerce

Would it mean the same thing if you put "No tienes ser tan formal"? Since ser infinitive is "to be".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porquepuedo
porquepuedo
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This is where many English speakers get confused. "Ser" does not mean 'to be', it means 'be'. The 'to' is just there in English to mark it as an infinitive - because you don't have the same power as in many other languages with the -er -ar and -ir endings.

Many verbs have words that go after the infinitive. Tener means 'to have' [and remember the 'to' is just showing the infiniteness] and 'tener que' means 'to have to [verb, do something]. PorquePuedo: Necesitar, intentar and querer [to need, to try and to want, respectively] are not exceptions, but merely... different cases. Necesito comer. I need to eat. Comer is the direct verb that you "need" to do. Intento bailar contigo pero no puedo porque me duele el pie. I try to dance with you but I can't because my foot hurts. [lol]

I am directly trying to dance. Quiero saltar del barco. I want to jump off the boat. [to my death] My wanting to jump is very direct.

Another way to say that you're 'trying to' do something is 'tratar'. This is an example of a word that needs another word after it to specify, because 'tratar' can mean two things: to treat, and to try. Lo trato. I treat him. Estoy tratando DE comer. I'm trying to eat. You need the DE in this sentence, that's just the way it is.

Querer and necesitar can also be used to say ...want to or ...need to. A little dialogue: André says: Quieres bailar conmigo? [do you want to dance with me?] then I say: No, no quiero. [no, I don't want TO]. So... querer and necesitar, when in verb form, mean 'want to' and 'need to' respectively.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OneVerce

Thank you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nihongoneko14
Nihongoneko14
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Que = what/that/to (dpending on the stence)/then (depending on the sentence)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stuart_HR

"We must not be so formal" was not excepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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That would be "no tenemos que ser..."

"No tienes..." is specifically addressed to an informal "you."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brettammend

Why is the que necessary? I'm still so confused by que.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

It's a set expression. Tener que = to have to (an obligation).

Examples:

  • Tienes que ir al trabajo = You have to go to work
  • (Ella) tiene que comer menos para bajar de peso = She has to eat less (in order) to lose weight.
  • Tengo que decirte algo = I have to tell you something
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZoranDuke
ZoranDukePlus
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"You must not be so formal." Should be marked as correct because it is the best translation to the Spanish speaking mind. "You don't have to be so formal." Is only logically correct, and mistakenly used with great frequency because it's assumed to be the opposite of, "You have to be so formal." But really the best phrase to communicate the idea of "You must not be so formal" to the Spanish speaking mind is to say, "It is not necessary to be so formal." "No es necesario que ser tan formal."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jabenpor
jabenpor
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what is the problem with.. you have not to be so formal or you do not have being so formal. both incorrect.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porquepuedo
porquepuedo
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Because neither of them make any sense. Is your native language English?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jabenpor
jabenpor
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my English is obviusly no good, but what is the gramatical failure in both sentences?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tetrateeth

I know this answer is very late, but this discussion reminded me of how many rules a native speaker follows without even knowing. I believe that pondering the rules of my own language helps me learn others, so I'll go ahead and type my thoughts.
The English term "have to" is equivalent to the Spanish "tener que", implying an obligation. When you put a "not" in front - "not have to", the "have to" is negated. The term "have not" however, has a completely different meaning, implying something was to happen, but did not - "You have not taken out the trash yet".
So the term "not have to" is essential in this translation. Building on that, any English verb that immediately follows the word "to" cannot be conjugated.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porquepuedo
porquepuedo
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You have not to be so formal

That means you must not be formal.

You do not have being so formal

I can't even start to explain what is wrong with that. It's just crazy wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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That's why I used the contraction "don't" instead of the words "do not".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pedrotaylor

the word 'must' is in the drop down menu. Why is it marked as wrong Tiene que is translated as 'must' of 'have to' Stop being so obtuse DL

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inbon
inbon
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Would "you don't have to be this formal" be wrong? D marked as such.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GuitarGreen

Shouldn't it be "No tienes que A ser tan formal"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichRx

Why que if to be = ser?

2 years ago