"Voi mangiate l'uva."

Translation:You eat the grapes.

May 28, 2013

94 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lorenagay
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Must've been one heck of a fight for that one grape.

February 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Prof_T_Entee

MY PRECIOUS! -cuddles grape-

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/spiderbread

Does l'uva count as plural here? Or are many people eating one single grape?

May 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Mimma.I.
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Hi! No, really you can only say "uva" in Italian. If you are a sommelier, you produce wine or are in plant-breeding programs then you will use "uve" to mean different types of plants or vine variety. HTH :)

February 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Popcornpop89

Ah, so it is exactly like the English use of the word fish, as BlakeCasper said above, because 'fish' can be plural for more than one of the same type of fish, but 'fishes' is technically correct to describe more than one of different types of fish. Interesting!

May 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anivad1
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I think a better analogy is how we use the word "grapes" in English. Because grapes are eaten in a bunch, we refer to grapes in the plural. In English we would say, "he eats grapes," "she eats grapes," or "I eat grapes." No one eats just one grape. However, if a grape falls from your brunch and you later step on the grape while walking barefoot in the kitchen, you can exclaim, "yuk, I stepped on a grape!"

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Punkmom

Thanks for the explanation!

May 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidFoster

I hear 'uva' can be a collective noun, but according to Wiktionary, 'uve' exists as a plural form of 'uva', so I don't know. Anyone more knowledgeable than I care to weigh in?

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuujen
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If I'm literally talking about 5 grapes (for example), I would say "cinque uve" but if I'm talking about grapes just in general I would say "l'uva". For example: Ho mangiato cinque uve oggi | Mi piace veramente l'uva

July 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/popester
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As it was taught to me (and, I think this helps native English speakers a lot), it's best to think of un'uva as a bunch of grapes and un acino as a single grape. You can have le uve, and that would be bunches of grapes, as, for example, from different varieties. The Italian concept is a bit more fluid than this, but it's a good underlying structure to use to understand what to say. On the Italian Wikipedia page for uva (http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uva), it says "Più propriamente l'uva è una infruttescenza, cioè un raggruppamento di frutti, detto grappolo. Il grappolo è composto da un graspo (o "raspo"), e da numerosi acini (detti anche chicchi, o più propriamente bacche)", which roughly translates in English to "More appropriately, l'uva is a multiple fruit, that is a grouping of fruits, called a cluster. The cluster is composed of a stalk and numerous acini (also called seeds, or more appropriately berries).

December 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinJorda

I wouldn't claim to be more knowledgeable, but for what it's worth, Google Translate gives either "grape" or "grapes" as the translation for "uva", and translates both "grape" and "grapes" into Italian as "uva", but when you add the definite article, "the grape" is translated "l'uva" and "the grapes" as "le uve". Of course, Google Translate has been known to make an error or two.

June 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Koolkaren
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Good question. I wondered that, too. I know that at least some nouns ending in 'a' do not change for the plural. ( city= città, cities = città ) I think. Wish I could be more help. :)

June 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuujen
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That's only when the 'a' has the grave accent above it 'à'.

July 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/SavvyCL

One grape. You guys are on a diet.

July 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/BlakeCasper

Yes, it could be viewed as that however in italian the word grape is both singular and plural much like the english word fish. these fish, that fish L'uva = the grape/grapes

November 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
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I'm just starting Italian (again) but wouldn't that change the article?

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
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Okay I just tried "you eat grapes" and it was marked as right. I will keep on learning.

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Grapes in Italy are like potato chips in the US - how can you stop at just one! :-)

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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Grazie, this analogy really helps!

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/suzanik
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Good point! I had to give you a Lingot for it, cause you made my day :))

December 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Telisa. I don't think so, since the noun itself as Blake explained is technically singular.

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
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Thank you.

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Punkmom

That was what I thought, too! "What are they going to do, cut it quarters?" LOL.

May 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
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It's a very large grape.

January 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Prof_T_Entee

a very VERY large grape

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanTrosky

Hello punkmom, what is LOL? I am Spanish and do not understand this, but I see it in poker online and would wish know its meaning. Thanks.

October 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/carlymino

It means Laughing Out Loud :)

October 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Punkmom

As carlymino says, it stands for Laughing Out Loud. It is used to express humor, like a smiley face or something.

October 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan8202
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Wow, this is an interesting understanding of culture!

January 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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It's used like a laugh, but don't overuse it. It gets annoying really quickly in the wrong circumstance for a lot of people.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

This is actually a wonderful way for friends and family to gather together at the dinner table...the only question being WHO brings the grape?

January 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Prof_T_Entee

ME!

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax
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... says one Italian ant hill to the next ...

September 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mrhawley01

I wrote "you all eat grapes" and still got the answer right.

October 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/geminikutie

That's because voi is plural but we don't really have a plural word for you in English so you could say you all or y'all

October 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/daemoninwhite

So according to Duolingo, the correct translation of this is ... y'all eat the grape? What?

October 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GenevieveLaurin
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That made me frown as well. English is not my native tongue, but I always got the impression that "y'all" was only used by rednecks or in a humorous way...

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Genevieve...y'all is very common in the spoken speech of the south, regardless of education or social station, but of course you'll find it less in writing, except between friends, but certainly not in formal or official writing. It does serve a very useful purpose, that being to distinguish singular and plural, much as other languages do. By the way, it's also used as a possessive -- "y'all's" as in "Is that y'all's car?"

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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Y'all has this stereotype of only being used by uneducated speakers, but that really isn't true. It's just an extremely useful word that's used by a lot of people in the South.

That is, as long as you don't use it in the singular...

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/BiancaPellet
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Can 'voi' be a formal 'you' for one person? Like 'vous' in French? That could explain the one grape...

July 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Koolkaren
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No, I thought that at first, too, but was set straight on one of these discussion pages. In Italian, voi is always plural. The formal 'you' is Lei ( like the word for 'she', but capitalized). I think I've got that right now.

July 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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tu = you
voi = you all
Lei = you (formal) Loro = you all (formal)

A lot more versatile than French, where vous is used for three out of those four! Plus, Lei and Loro aren't overused like in French.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

I understand that Italian publishers have abridged & turned Steinbeck's great novel into a novella called "The Grape of Wrath."

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Fatima85923

It looks like a command, why can it not be translated by "eat the grape", without "you"?

September 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EsperantoEthan

hol' up, why is l'uve incorrect?

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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L'uva but le uve; l' is only singular.

Also, uva is a mass noun, so both a singular grape and a bunch of grapes are l'uva. It works the same way in French, too. Sometimes, le uve is used by wine makers etc. to talk about types of grapes, but never as just the regular plural of grapes.

Think of it like with English "rice" : both a grain of rice and a plate of rice are the same word. Just imagine that but with grape.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/VipulKapoo

As on August 20, 2014 "you eat grape" is marked wrong. Correct answers are "you eat grapes" or "you eat the grape"

August 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Qov-jIH-je

"You eat grape" is not a normal English sentence. A native English speaker would say "you eat a grape" or "you eat the grape". We only omit the article in the plural, or when the the noun is a mass noun, like water or jelly. Grape is not a mass noun in English.

April 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

You're correct with the English, but my understanding of the Italian is that the singular is often used even when a plural meaning is intended.

April 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Qov-jIH-je

Yes, the Italian is correct, but "you eat grape" is not marked correct, because it isn't a correct English sentence.

April 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/amzy1999

What a strange sight that would be to behold.

September 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

For all of us who missed this one, sour grapes.

December 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewBags15
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Lol!

January 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/manikH

Since it asks to be translated from Voi, technically it should be more than one grapes so the acceptable translation should indicate that.

December 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jazzynmv

Wait, so "tu mangia" would be one person eating it. And "voi mangiate" is like saying "you all", right?

January 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Hope this isn't sour grapes, but no, 'tu mangia' is incorrect. It'd be 'tu mangi' and 'voi mangiate'. The form 'mangia' is 3rd person singular & the familiar imperative.

January 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/geminikutie

On top of what Tom said, and more to your point, tu is singular while voi is plural, yes.

October 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/iiZachIverson

Good luck my little grape. ;)

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Skinborncarlz

Well, that's a very small meal.

April 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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L'uva in Italian is a mass noun; it can mean either one grape or a plate of grapes, or a mountain of grapes.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
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so it's the same in Italian whether you say "you eat the grape" or "you eat the grapes" ?

June 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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Yes.

How do you tell the difference in English between "You eat the rice" (a grain of rice) and "You eat the rice" (a plate of rice)?

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeSchwa

Sooo tu & voi help me understand the diff

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

'tu' is singular familiar as in "Hey you! (Put that down, that's MY grape)" and 'voi' is plural familiar, which in English could be you, you all, y'all, or yuz guys depending of course on how much of the (fermented) grape you've (all) had by the time they close the bar.

January 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anivad1
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Awesome explanation! I think I finally understand the "plural familiar" tense.

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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It isn't really a tense so much as "first person singular" is a tense; voi is just a pronoun that doesn't exist in standard English but does in Italian.

Tenses are usually reserved for verbs: present imperative, past indicative etc.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Prendy1

why cant it be "Voi mangi l'uva"? Too many words mean eat, already. lol

March 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Maybe I missed your point, but 'voi' is plural you as in y'all, while 'mangi' is singular. So the verb has to be 'mangiate' if you stay with 'voi'. No if you change the subject to "tu" then 'mangi' would be correct - and not only correct, but you'd also eliminate the fight over that damn grape!

March 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/joshua.zhi

Io mangio(i eat) Tu mangi(you eat) Lui/lei mangia(he/she eats) Noi mangiamo(we eat) Voi mangiate(you all eat) Loro mangiano(they eat)

May 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

Joshua.zhi: STOP IT! BASTA! You're making me hungry!

May 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/NinaSanthiran

what about you'll instead of you all

June 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

NinaSanthiran: These mean two different things: 'you'll' is a contraction of 'you will' (future) whereas 'you all' which is sometimes in the southern US contracted to 'y'all' is one way of trying to express a plural familiar and is simply a pronoun subject.

June 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshGommez

Is this a comand?

June 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoZoldan

No, but it's tecnically possible because the imperative and the present tenses are similar .
indicativo presente - imperativo
io mangio
tu mangi - tu mangia
lui/lei mangia - lui/(lei mangi
noi mangiamo - noi mangiamo
voi mangiate - voi mangiate
loro mangiano - loro mangino

When the verbal desinence leave no doubt the personal pronouns can be omitted, to grat reason if you give an order "Mangiate l'uva!". We can put the pronoun to point out someone doing a little pose just after "Voi, mangiate l'uva!/Voi!...mangiate l'uva!". To make the difference betwenn the present and the imperative talking we do it by the tone , writing by an exclamation mark.

June 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mapofmyheart

Why is it mangiate and not mangi like tu mangi?

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Germanlehrerlsu

mapofmyheart: because the subject is 'you plural' - voi and so the verb form is 'mangiate'. It'd only be 'tu mangi' if it were 'you singular familiar.'

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/evaluijendijk

i always think Voi means they, because vous in French means they and it looks the same. :')

January 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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But vous doesn't mean they in French, it means you all (voi)... They would be ils/elles.
Je = io
Tu = tu
Il = lui
Elle = lei
Nous = noi
Vous = voi
Ils, elles = loro
See the similarities in a few of them? Of course, they don't match up exactly, but they all come from the same Latin.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ZackyD92

How many words are there that mean eat? I'm going to need a spreadsheet on how to tell the difference.

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/russtang
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https://www.duolingo.com/EsperantoEthan

"mangiare" means to eat and there are many conjugations. Search up "mangiare" conjugations

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DylanThatcher

So "l'uva" can be both "grape" and "grapes"?

December 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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See above, please.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/PHN04

I was just surprised by the fact that "l'uva" apparently means "the grapes", seemingly a special situation in the Italian language. But now "You eat the grapes" is given as wrong again! Especially remarkable given that one would certainly be more likely to eat several grapes.

This is all very confusing, so I have submitted a problem report to Duolingo. Per favore un spiegazione!

March 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/VivArch1

"Come to dinner honey, we're eating a grape.'

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/shiraneeeh
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uva is non plural

May 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MicheleRos13
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There's no plural for grapes? Uva for both plural and singular?

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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See above.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria275082

Questo è molto strano ma io capisco!

July 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Elaine539376

Is l"uva singular or plural?

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob
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See above.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/kristencox
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I wrote "you eat the grape" and was marked wrong!!

July 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger799175

Well I've read all these comments and I still don't understand why "you eat the grape" is wrong.

December 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/HaggenKennedy

Because "uva" stands for "grapes" in the plural (it's "le uva"). The article "le" shows you it's a feminine plural (the article for feminine singular is "la").

"If it's plural, why don't we say 'le uve' then?!", you ask. Because "le uve" means "different species of grapes" (if you own a vineyard and supply different types of grapes to different winemakers, for example). It's like "fish" or "people" in English. They can be plural even if they have a singular form. If you say "fishes" or "peoples" it means "different types of fish" or "different groupings of people", perhaps "people of different nations".

There are other nouns in Italian that behave weirdly. For example, "bone". In the singular, it's "l'osso" (masculine), but becomes feminine in the plural: "le ossa". It should be "le osse", but instead it's "le ossa". It's one of the exceptions in Italian (every language has exceptions).

January 26, 2019
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