"Lei poteva fare di tutto."

Translation:She could do anything.

May 29, 2013

37 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chinmayhej

Why is it "di tutto" and not just "tutto"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Philip-

I am Italian , I don't know exactly but I THINK is that 'Di tutto' means exactly everything , instead 'tutto ' can be translated as " All ". Tutto il giorno = all day Io mangio di tutto = i eat everything . P.s : it isn't a big error if you say tutto instead of " Di tutto " ! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcolmissimo

Tutto is everything and di tutto is anything (in Duo's sense of everything possible). Be careful translating 'anything' to Italian because it has other senses too.

I don't like Duo's "could" because it is ambiguous and translates just as well to the conditional potrebbe. "She was [or used to be] able to do anything" is unambiguous, and accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/German4me22

It always seem to be "Fare di" and not just Fare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanMcNeill

Wow ... in English there is a huge difference between anything and everything in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sbt5

Does this mean "She had many talents", "Her actions could not be predicted", or either?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baggiemews

Good question sbt, I'd also be interested in the answer.Can any Italians/fluent speakers help us?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiwiGuy

"She could make anything" should be accepted as well! Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/divaluisa

I said: she was able to do it all Rejected. Anyone know why? I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SJKIrk

"She could do everything"? Surely "poteva" is past tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patschge

"she could do everything" was my translation, too, and today it was accepted by duolingo (02,12,2014)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

Yes it is, she could, meaning she was able to, imperfect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/involans

"Could" is also past tense - it is the past tense of "can"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaymondWil20

"she could have done it all" wasn't accepted. Is there something grammatically incorrect in this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

Yes, I think that would need a past participle,maybe aver fatto


[deactivated user]

    I think you're both right. "She could have done it all" should have been accepted; but a more correct way of saying "She could have done it all" would be "Lei avrebbe potuto fare di tutto." IMHO


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rcpjenn

    What about "she can do it all?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mico_di_Ostia

    For my excercise, i am to type the words from the audio. Since "lei" and "le" cannot be distinguished verbally, couldn't this sound like, "Le poteva fare di tutto" and still make sense?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adam415f

    I suppose that 'fare tutto' means 'to make everything' while 'fare di tutto' - 'to make anything' in English


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crazy4hazy

    Could you just say "lei poteva tutto fare"? Thank you.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

    I think the fare needs to be beside poteva


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crazy4hazy

    Ok, any particular reason? Just to help me remember for next time? And ta for replying, anyway.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

    nope it's just that it seems the normal to keep the handle verb together with its mate


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crazy4hazy

    Ah yes. I tend to rely on French too much, as they are both romance languages, and sadly it can be a trap, as with Spanish, for ex. I'm sure... Oh well.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelThom27190

    Under the new form of the verb being introduced there is a pull down tab saying "conjugate" am I missing something or does this conjugate section then go on to show the present tense not the imperfect? I am assuming I am missing something here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kauheeta

    Is "She could do anything" conditional or imperfect ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkledOnion

    Can anybody tell me how to say 'she could have done anything?', per favore?x


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lenka734784

    That sentence would follow the rules of Conditional Perfect tense. She could have done anything = Lei avrebbe potuto fare niente. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisLomba

    she used to be able to do it all? feel like thats a better translation


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

    Lei poteva fare di tutto ma oggidì non può fare nulla!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lilian606898

    My answer is "she could have done everying". Why is it wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

    Lilian I think this one highlights the problem of a computer answering. Poteva is clearly and simply imperfetto, a past and habitual tense. Could in English might be a past tense of can, ora present conditional. Have done opens even more possibilities including a pluperfect. There are so many permutations it is probably best to focus on the Italian and put it down to "the computer says no"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikom853445

    I put 'She couId do everything.' but DLG put WRONG!! In past coments at least one said DLG marked correct. I am quite confuse with this.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John955060

    Excuse me, but doesn't"tutto" mean "everything"?! Isn't "She was able to do everything" mean the same thing as "She could do anything"?!

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