https://www.duolingo.com/Ikamjh

Plans to expand speaking in Irish course

Ikamjh
  • 22
  • 16
  • 10
  • 7

I was wondering if there were any plans to expand the words that are spoken in the Irish course. Will eventually we be able to hear words on mouse over and for every single phrase?

4 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

There's a lot of issues that need to be taken care with the audio before they should add the rest of the sentences. The main one is getting a competent speaker, and not one that uses English phonology.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
alexinIreland
  • 25
  • 24
  • 21
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10

1) Re: The question asked by the poster: No, we don't currently have plans to expand the audio, but we are still in the early stages of beta, so it may be possible later on. 2) Re: Galaxyrocker's comment: Today we completed submitting our feedback so many mistakes in the audio (such as the pronunciation of "dinnéar") will be fixed in the next few days. But still, I think it is unfair to say that the speaker is incompetent. Yes, there were a few mistakes which will be/have been fixed but many things people are reporting are due to dialect, etc. Just because it sounds different doesn't mean it's wrong. Also, it is very rare that a speaker of any language (native or not) pronounces every word correctly. Please take these points into consideration.

Also, don't forget the great parts of our course: our good friend Pól and the self conscious elephant, our modern words like "selfie" and "vegan", our low sentence reports and the amazing community!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

So, now that I'm not on mobile, I'll make this a little better.

I'm not saying this course is bad, and I'm certainly not forgetting the good points of it. I believe that we have an opportunity to reverse the trend of the Irish language, but we can't do that if the speaker isn't speaking native Irish but is instead using school Irish.

If you can assure me that there will be a difference between leabhar and leabhair, and that the will actually be pronounced as a flap, and that and will be correct, and consistent, as will all the other consonants, broad or slender, then I'll certainly lay off the case. This isn't a dialect issue, unless you count "school Irish", or gaelscois as a dialect; she's certainly not using native Gaeltacht born pronunciation and that's a problem. If you don't think it's wrong, look at all the people, who know Irish (some are even native speakers!) claiming it's bad. See here and the myriad of them throughout the sentence discussions and the discussion forum (trust me, they're there). If those issues can't be fixed, it might be time to change the speaker. If Duolingo doesn't want to pay people, we can crowdfund it, or might even be able to find a volunteer with the right setup. But quit beating around the bush saying "it'll be fixed." Give us explicit changes, and don't call non-dialectal things (like lack of broad/slender) as "dialectal issues". Also, I was able to accept how dinnéar is said, because, I read somewhere, it's like that in the Déise dialect. Though why use one of the least spoken I don't know.

But again, I'm not saying the course is bad. In fact, quite the opposite. I believe this could be used to help build a bilingual Ireland, but why settle for subpar pronunciation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ikamjh
Ikamjh
  • 22
  • 16
  • 10
  • 7

Thanks!

I wasn't trying to bash your course... I have enjoyed it so far.

The two biggest areas for improvement for now seem to be the audio (mostly since its harder to learn pronunciation when fewer phrases and words have audio. Also it is really nice to be able to hear new words spoken when you first learn them) and to not have that weird thing where sometimes it asks for an article and sometimes it doesn't when it shows you the picture and asks you to type the word for "___" that the picture is showing.

Of course I think it would be really great if all of the courses slowly expanded, adding new skills and lessons when they are out of beta, but thats down the road.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
alexinIreland
  • 25
  • 24
  • 21
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10

Re: The images...we are in the process of adding all the articles to the images so article exercises can be created (similar to German)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ikamjh
Ikamjh
  • 22
  • 16
  • 10
  • 7

Oh ok thanks! And thanks a lot for the course!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pillowpillar
pillowpillar
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Can you please read this thread? http://bit.ly/1rCPKOI (Or even the first 3 pages) The pronunciation issues are not due to dialect. She is simply missing out on the broad/slender distinctions which makes her pronunciation wrong. It is not a dialect issue. I implore you to fix this; the community is certainly willing to help! If you need more convincing please read this thread - https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4305589

** Edit The first link is also what galaxyrocker tried to link to. There are problems using certain urls from that site.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
  • 25
  • 23
  • 21
  • 16
  • 14
  • 10
  • 8
  • 1904

I am very happy about the modern words! can wait to get to that lesson! :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NataliaMakarova
NataliaMakarova
  • 25
  • 22
  • 14
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

I know! I was just wondering today how to say "vegan" in Irish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NiallT
NiallT
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3

Hooray! Zeess eez good noose for all of uz who spek Eengleesh weef a Oorupeen dialect. I trust zat Duolingo weel agzept uz ass natteev Eengleesh spekkers...?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Byblos2
Byblos2
  • 15
  • 12
  • 8
  • 6
  • 4

THANKS for this course! And yet of course, phonology and orthography in Irish are so very, very difficult. Comments below, about finding one competent speaker to record the examples, still encounters the problem of highly distinctive regional dialects. I think it would help to provide a phonological guide to the dialect being used (example: a Trinity College native speaker told me I sounded "neutral" when I spoke the sounds I learned here).

Also, as you move forward on recording - regardless of dialect consistently used - take a cue from the Spanish course: provide a normal pace of speaking, and also a slower, word - by - word version, so learners can hear each bit clearly.

Thanks again, and looking forward to updates!

1 year ago
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.