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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/superluigi13

How to tell if an Irish noun is feminine (or not)???

I read the note on Lenition, and I was extremely confused. I understand it somewhat and when it's used, but my problem is figuring out how to determine if lenition is needed or not. Can someone elaborate?

September 5, 2014

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckalenda

Someone posted this link in a discussion thread for one of the exercise threads: http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/subst3.htm I haven't had time to do more than skim it, but all the information seems to be there, if a bit dense.

Someone also posted a diagram that I saved to my computer, but I don't know how to get it on here, so I'll just copy it out for you (start at the top and work your way down):

Abstract noun ending in -e, -í → f4 (feminine 4th declension, I'm thinking)

Ends in a vowel or -ín → m4

Ends in -áil, -ail, -úil, -úint, -cht, irt → f3

Ends in -éir, eoir, óir, úir (professions) → m3

Ends in slender consonant or -eog, -óg, -lann → f2

Ends in broad consonant → m1

Hopefully those will help you out, at least until someone gets here who knows more than me! When in doubt, you can check in an Irish-English dictionary, which will list the gender in the word's entry. I use this one: http://breis.focloir.ie/en/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

For reference, the chart is posted in this here thread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

It's a good idea to always attribute sources. That comes from this page: http://www.nualeargais.ie/foghlaim/nouns.php


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/superluigi13

Thank you! I will be referencing this a lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PopTartTastic

Do 1, 2, 3, and 4 refer to declensions or something like that? If so, will you give me a lingot? Maybe? It's okay you don't have to. :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yes, they do refer to the declension class of the noun.

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