"Do you have children?"

Translation:An bhfuil clann agat?

4 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ceruttis
ceruttis
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I never learned this meaning of chlann in school or ever heard it used like that - only ever as family. Perhaps it's regional usage?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GillianBryan

Exact same for me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaylaKnowe

gasúr is also a suitable word for children. it used to only refer to boys but is now used for both sexes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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In my reading, I've seen gasúr used for children of both sexes, but never used it myself because, as you say, it was just a word for a young boy, and I've never heard it used in the region where I've studied, so I'm not confident enough to use it myself. Is it regional?

I believe gasúir would be needed in this sentence, wouldn't it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LenaCapaillUisce

Is there a reason clann is used instead of páisti'? Are they synonyms?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Páistí is children in general; clann is your children. I don't know for sure why DL used clann -- perhaps because it's more specific???

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LenaCapaillUisce

I see, go raibh maith agat. Interesting that in another exercise I saw 'an bhfuil páistí uathu?', I think it was - maybe DL just rotates the usage for exposure to different words. GRMA

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeBusch5

extra space ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dar...
Dar...
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Is clann used to mean 'immediate family' (i.e. your kids) in a modern Gaeilge slang way?

I've only come across it referring to family in the broadest sense (i.e. immediate family plus other blood-related close family of the same surname, plus occasionally, closely blood-related other families, such as those daughters marry into and 2nd/3rd cousins evolve into through marriage etc): come across up to now that is.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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It refers to your children and is the standard usage. It is not any sort of slang. Read some of the other posts on this page.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dar...
Dar...
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Thanks. I did see your previous post and I'm not doubting you, but I've not come across it before in relation to something as specific as just your own children.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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It's a common misconception. Here's something from the 'Cruinneas' section of the website aistear.ie:

CLANN / TEAGHLACH / MUINTIR Is ionann ‘clann’ agus na páistí a bheirtear do thuismitheoirí. Is ionann ‘teaghlach’ agus 'muintir' agus an líon tí go léir, idir pháistí agus tuismitheoirí agus daoine muinteartha. B'ait an rud é, mar sin, déagóir a rá go bhfuil ochtar ina chlann nó gur chaith sé an Nollaig lena chlann. 'Tá ochtar sa teaghlach' agus 'Chaith mé an Nollaig le mo mhuintir' atá i gceist aige dáiríre.

Úsáidtear ‘clann’ chomh maith ag trácht ar shinsir daoine nó de ghrúpa daoine arb ionann sloinne dóibh: ‘duine de Chlann Uí Ruairc é’.

Your previous knowledge is mentioned in the second paragraph while the more common meaning (clann = your children) is in the first paragraph.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dar...
Dar...
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Thanks, but completely beyond my capacity to understand. One day perhaps.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Oh. Here's the first sentence: Is ionann ‘clann’ agus na páistí a bheirtear do thuismitheoirí. 'Clann' is the same as children born to parents.

1 month ago
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