"Anbhfuiltorthaíuainn?"

Translation:Do we want fruit?

4 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
  • 17
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 4
  • 1230

OK, now, in the last sentence, I was asked, before this phrase was introduced at all, to translate something of the form "Tá X uaim" and was told it meant "I need X." Now I am told "An bhfuil X uainn" cannot mean "do we need X," but rather must mean "do we want X." What is the deal here? Does it only indicate necessity when the preposition applies to a singular pronoun, but indicates desire when it applies to a plural? Is necessity limited to the first person singular pronoun? This phrase may very well demonstrate the weakness of this instructional method, at least when applied to a language like Irish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Sorry, there were some mistakes in the suggested translations for a couple of phrases in this section.

  • Tá X uaim only means I want X.
  • Teastaíonn X uaim can mean either I want X, or I need X.

We've added a section in "Tips and notes" to explain the construction!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1536

These examples using and ó are given at the focloir.ie dictionary site:

  • Cad tá uait? What do you want?

  • Níl do chomhluadar uainn, we don't want your company.

  • Ní raibh uaidh ach sin, that was all he needed.

Is the last example incorrect with its use of “needed”?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Let's just say that it's open to discussion ;) As you can see the phrases are quite closely linked in Irish and there is some idiomatic overlap, but it is probably better to stick closely to the rules for the purpose of explaining things here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The last one actually seems like it means "want", but was translated to "needed" to make the English seem better.

"He didn't want but that." make sense, but is better expressed in English as "That was all he needed." So, really, I think "want" is better used for ó in that situation, but sometimes the English phrasing requires it to be different.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TreasaWilson

It's very confusing. Can't you at least be consistent between one sentence and the next. This is still the case two years after the original post.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1536

All of the pronomial forms of the preposition ó (uaim, uainn, etc.) can be used for either “want” or “need”; see the fourth entry for ó, definition 4 (b) at focloir.ie. (As you can see there, it can be used for many other meanings as well.) The deal here is that the range of accepted answers for these questions is incomplete if they don’t accept both “want” and “need” for answers; Irish is still in beta here, so don’t expect perfection yet.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The last one actually seems like it means "want", but was translated to "needed" to make the English seem better.

"He didn't want but that." make sense, but is better expressed in English as "That was all he needed." So, really, I think "want" is better used for ó in that situation, but sometimes the English phrasing requires it to be different.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
  • 17
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 4
  • 1230

That's really very helpful. Thank you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dfpeterson
dfpeterson
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 1168

The whole "from us"/"want" translation of uainn throws me off constantly. Is there any way to remember when it means what?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoraOSulli

Yerwan has such a strong Donegal accent. I can understand Munster or Connaught accents no problem, but i lose marks because of her unintelligible Northern drawl

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

You've obviously never spoken to someone from Gaoth Dobhair. This speaker is clearly NOT from Donegal, though some of her pronunciations show some northern influence, but it's a minor influence.

Even the pronunciation of the very first word, "an" makes it clear that this speaker does not speak Irish with a Donegal accent.
http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/an

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allverdizade

So ó is a preposition meaning "from", but also used to indicate desire? Literally "the fruit is from me" = "I want the fruit"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RodneyMarsh261
RodneyMarsh261
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 223

couldn't torthai also mean results?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thinker.ie
Thinker.ie
  • 16
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

It means both fruit(s) and results. Its use is dependent on context.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talbotmews
Talbotmews
  • 25
  • 25
  • 11
  • 10
  • 2
  • 454

In the last translation of torthaí was results and this time it means fruit? That cant be right

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OrchidBlack
OrchidBlack
  • 25
  • 20
  • 19
  • 18
  • 18
  • 18
  • 18
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1516

I'm a native English speaker, but in English, "fruits" or "fruit" can be used idiomatically for "results". "The fruits of his labour" meaning, "the results of his labour". I would assume it's the same idea here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

She isn't asking a question. She sounds like she's making a statement. Reported it. (I try to listen to the sentence before I look at the sentence.)

3 years ago
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.