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"Vas demasiado lejos."

Translation:You go too far.

5 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/baker910

Can someone clarify if "too far" is like in English, meaning that you can either go "too far" in distance or "too far" in a figurative sense? Does the figurative sense have a separate word?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harvest1986

Hey baker, My mother is a native speaker from Cuba and she says that it is hardly ever used figuratively. It's more common to say (Te pasaste de linia) which translates to ( you crossed the line ) Bare in mind that other Spanish speaking countries may have there own way of saying it that I'm not sure about.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyFal1

god, i wish i had family that spoke spanish, that i could practice with. lucky bastard!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

So true. I have a friend whose family came from Mexico and Spanish was not allowed in the house to "assimilate" to English. When we were in the service our spanish buddies would try and speak Spanish to him and he didn't know what they were saying. My Spanish is terrible, which is why I am here, but I still tried translating. They all knew English though, but it was still embarassing for him. He is singing the praises of Duolingo. I just got him started

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyFal1

Sounds like an effective way to assimilate, but that's somewhat unfortunate. It's cool that he's relearning? the language now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BerentBozkurt

Sorry if the question is a little bit irrelevant but why did you use Te instead of Tú?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Because he/she was using the pronominal verb (i.e., the reflexive type of prominal; the other type is reciprocal), pasarse (meaning, "to go over"). Since the form was being used, there was no need for the "Tú" to be in the sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaedFarun
RaedFarun
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I want to know this too, that's why I checked the comments

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sparkplug
sparkplug
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'You are going too far.' should be a correct translation, no?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrallenu

Absolutamente! It depends on context, but it can be "You (informal) go too far" or "You're (informal) going too far."

Duolingo must not have the best of translators.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

sparkplug: Everyone who said "You are going too far", please report it to Duolingo, not just here on the discussion page.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/craftytexangirl

That would be present participle! Estás yendo demasiado lejos.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espanola_amanda

Actually, the present tense "vas" can be translated "you are going" also.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cardano
Cardano
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Amanda is correct; often in Spanish the simple present is/can be used as the present progressive.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liraneitan

it's accepted now

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagAonghusa
MagAonghusa
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Is this the same as the English phrase that means to do more than is acceptable.

Example: "I didn't mind but you have gone too far"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

As indicated by others, the phrase is literal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtremenak
dtremenak
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I am not a native speaker and can't answer with certainty if this phrase can carry the same figurative meaning in Spanish, but the English phrase is used figuratively in place of a Hebrew idiomatic expression by most modern Bible translators (ESV, NIV, RSV) in Numbers 16 (repeated a few times in the conversation between Moses and Korah). The Spanish equivalent in both LBLA and RV is "¡Basta ya de vosotros!" (Enough of you!), but NVI does use "¡Ustedes han ido ya demasiado lejos!" (You all have gone too far!).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Interesting that the Biblical Spanish is Basta ya... Usually one says Ya basta (Enough already).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espanola_amanda

Doubly interesting, I have always heard "basta ya".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vicky_Spanish

This "too" is going to be the death of me on duolingo!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jovanvukadinovic

Translating with past simple seems more logical.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isenhatesyou
Isenhatesyou
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Could this be a command? "Go further"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

No, that would be "ve más lejos"*, with the imperative form of the verb "ir" (ve).

*I think "further" = "más lejos", am I wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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Yes "más lejos" is "further."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Thank you :]

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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You probably already knew that by now, but I wanted to clarify for others reading through here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EDK-Learner
EDK-Learner
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Why is "You are going too far" wrong when "You go too far" is correct!!!!!!!!!!!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristinbrown09

I think when you put an "ing" on a verb it takes a different form, and you have to conjugate it with estar. Ex: I am talking = Yo estoy hablando vs I talk = Yo hablo

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Kristin: "yo hablo" can mean: "I talk", "I do talk", "I am talking". "Yo estoy hablando" also means "I am talking" but in the context of "right now".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TexMexChica

It says lejos means "far away" so I answered, " You go too far away" and it's wrong. Maybe this is going too far in the figurative sense?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PniB
PniB
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ha ha, I wanted to put 'you go too far away' because that is what I would say to my daughter when she runs away, but I know from experience that Duolingo's acceptable answers are unpredictable. Can someone please tell us if 'You go too far AWAY' is a correct translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aelfwyne

"You go too far" is perfectly acceptable in English despite protests to the contrary. We could also say "You are going too far" but the meaning is different. The first "go" basically says in general, you go too far. The second, "going", says that RIGHT NOW you are going too far.

Now the question is, does this merely mean distance, such as a person's commute is too long? Or does it mean figuratively, like they're saying things they shouldn't? It could mean both in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiderloft

I said: va demasiado lejos and it said I used the usted form...I though usted meant you??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skittlzz
skittlzz
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I said "Go too far" and got it wrong. Apparently I missed a word. The translation is "You go too far." I didn't write the "you" because often in Spanish it's ok to omit the pronoun. Why is "Go too far" wrong? Is it because it's a command in this case?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtremenak
dtremenak
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Unlike Spanish, in English it's NOT acceptable to omit the pronoun. You may write either "Tú vas..." or just "Vas..." in Spanish, but you MUST write "You go..." in English to convey the same meaning as either one. If you omit the pronoun in English, it becomes imperative form, for which the Spanish would be "ve" instead of "vas."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patriceiayu

difference in spanish between - you go too far - and - you've gone too far - ? :S

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca_Reyes

Incorrect spelling. Close enough

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/57flora

Confused again i thought demasaido meant too much enough much too far correct to be wrong with way too far ?????

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erick_701

You are going so far. why is that not correct?

1 year ago