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  5. "Hvem er din kæreste?"

"Hvem er din kæreste?"

Translation:Who is your girlfriend?

September 5, 2014

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theodric

Well the good news is that Duolingo accepts the neutral term "partner" so we can finally stop worrying about it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/octavi.ers

hooray!! det elsker jeg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Estaban429727

Never thought of that word. I decided not to blow the poor owl's mind with boy/girlfriend and went sexist


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skullcap

wait a minute...the word for girlfriend and boyfriend is the same word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjarkehs

Yes, we don't discriminate :P I once had an English speaking girlfriend whose mother thought I was gay. This happened because she was doing a background check on me, and I had written a sentence where I had said: "min kæreste", which had then been translated to "my boyfriend"..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexandralanc

Concerned that she was doing a background check - was she MI5?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb

Yes, literally translated it means "dearest"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/22decembre

Something I like, it means "the one you love", no matter which sex you are, what is your sexuality...

Min kærste is only the one I love, only thing needed to know !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GigiGottwald

I also thought it meant "the one you love", but DL rejected "beloved" and suggested "love" instead. This doesn't make sense to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

But even the sentence "the one you love" is not possible in most languages without specifying a certain gender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maymann

I think 'partner' is the most appropriate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iuventas

Why wouldn't "spouse" work? I'm not native English speaker, but I thought it was a gender neutral word for boyfriend or girlfriend


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb

"Spouse" would mean that they're married, kæreste is before marriage or being engaged. Ægtefælle is the Danish word for "spouse"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iuventas

Thank you for clarification!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

Could English "care" be a cognate of "kæreste"? Because you care for your kæreste (hopefully).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fred-3-CMY

I do not think so because "to care" has Germanic roots (the same word part of German "Karfreitag"), whereas "kæreste", Swedish "kärlek" etc. are most likely derived from Latin "carus".

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