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"The beer is for the peasants."

Translation:La cerveza es para los campesinos.

5 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/stewbot
stewbot
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I have had to use both "por" and "para" for the English word "for"...how do you know when to use each?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

Don't think of them both as a translation of the word "for" because that gets very confusing and is often not the case. Try to get a grasp of their function instead. For example para implies motion from something to something else, or something happening as a result of something else, or "in order to". "Voy a la escuela para aprender...". I go to the school in order to learn. Por on the other hand is used to mean "by way of" or through. It's not about cause and effect. "Voy a la escuela por autob├║s." I go to the school by bus. Of course there are times when they do translate to or from the word "for" but if you get a good grasp of their individual functions you'll often wind up picking the right one in those situations. Hope this helps!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MCroisant
MCroisant
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This is one of the great struggles of learning Spanish. You can read more about it at http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/porpara.htm

In this case, it's para because the campesinos are the intended recipients of the beer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rafer45

Para is when it's meant as if "for someone" Por is by.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anujjie

Keep doing practice questions and inevitably you'll start to learn when to use which.. but yeah, it's one of the early humps when learning spanish lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darrellr

I have been trying to figure this out as well. However, this one was a bit more clear cut. As the sentence indicates something is "for" someone, I believe para is always used.

In reading up on this subject, there are definitely a number of rules to memorize. For an added complication, it is not always obvious which rule applies to which sentence. I suspect it becomes much clearer with time.

Rafer45 stated something that appears to hold true in many cases. When the word is "by" in English, it seems to often (always?) to be por in Spanish. However, there are many other instances that por is used when translating from "for" in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anandamid
Anandamid
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This short lesson is very(!) helpful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cBJoq479NM

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marleyblue

Is "campesinos" a commonly used word? Does it have any insulting connotations? (The translation of "peasants" makes me hesitant to use it for fear of insulting someone.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpracheShinobi

There seem to be a number of words from medieval times which carry additional meanings today:

"Caballero" originally meant "knight", but today means "gentleman".

"Campesinos" meant "peasants", but today refers to "farmers".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

Interesting! Would campesinos be a slightly derogatory word for farmers whereas granjeros would be the politically correct way to say it or are they both common? Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpracheShinobi

Here are the results of my research:

"As I see it, campesino can of course be a farmer - but for us in the north of Mexico, we see it as a country person - not a negative by the way -- a rustic - or even as the pejorative - peasant. Granjero, on the other hand is clearly a farmer or farm worker in all areas having to do with agriculture."

"I'm not a native speaker, but as far as I can make it out both words are more or less synonyms when referring to a farmer, but whereas campesino refers to the land, the fields, the countryside (el campo), granjero refers to the farm, la granja. But neither of them has quite the same negative connotation that the English 'peasant' sometimes has."

"Campesino is fine, no negative implication; used a lot for ' rural person', or countryperson, farmer or not."

So there you have it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MishalaRay
MishalaRay
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My husband is frrom Mexico. He says campensinos is not a commonly used word but it is not insulting. Another word that is more used is Pobre, which IS sort of insulting. You should not use it in front of someone you are talking about. Ranchero is another word for Granjero and neither are insulting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I know it's not real life, but in one of the telenovelas I've watched, they say campesino and paisano fairly frequently but part of the story is set out on a very remote rural hacienda.

The only character in the story that uses campesino as an insult is a very snobby woman who is obsessed with money and lives in a beach town. She also uses muerto de hambre as insult.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmyMorris

Why is "campesinas" not accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gypsybird
gypsybird
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It should be, because it's correct. Redo the exercise and report it, if you want it to be noticed by those responsible for the course.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boot2
boot2
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or labradores?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I've always thought of campesinos as sort of country people, tiny town folks. Peasant does have a sort of negative or medieval connotation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BartMilner

Yes, unless it is in a historical context (eg The Peasants Revolt) peasant is almost always an insult in English and DL should not be using it to translate a non-pejorative term in Spanish. Living in France I got the impression that paysan was also usually an insult.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hulkbulgur

Hmm, shouldn't "granjeros" (farmers) also be considered valid?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coldbeets

Based on a comment I saw earlier, "Granjero" seems to be a farmer of livestock and such, while "Campesino" is more like a serf or peasant who works the land.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuskoE

Granjero sounds to me like the word "rancher" which would imply cattle, or if you are in Cali, almonds. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaileyL91

Why is it "es" and not "esta'"?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmeraldElement

Ser (es) means 'is' as in describing something as an adjective (Es blanco) or another noun (Es un estudiante). Estar (esta) is usually used for describing where something is located (Esta aqui) or temporary events like the weather "it's raining" (Esta lloviendo) or "how are you?" (Como estas? / Estoy cansado)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magnolitao

You are right but... is Hailey right ? I think this is a temporary event to prepare beers for people. Then I agree with Hailey. Estar is better than ser here, no ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PizzaEnthusiasm

Preparing the beer is a temporary event, but the sentence is "the beer is for the peasants." It's discussing the state of the beer, which is that it is owned by the peasants. The beer, for as long as it exists, will always be for the peasants. This is a permanent state, so ser is correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/intelleckttt

I had a sentence that said "The room is dedicated to me". I used es & was marked wrong. Why is es correct in the other sentence but not this one?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/intelleckttt

I mean, why is it correct here but wrong in "The room is dedicated to me"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebunny84ppg

The 'is dedicated' is the full verb, a present participle type, and estar is always used for these. So it would be 'esta dedicando', but here, the is is isolated from other verbs, and it is not how you feel or where you are, so you use ser.

Hope that helps!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edd1em1ller

I put la chela which i am nearly 100% sure is used as beer also.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehui22

Chela is slang for beer, mainly used in Mexico.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StepStevenson

Is there a reason my "las cervezas" was not taken? There are more than one peasants shouldn't there be more than one beer? Or is it my fault for assuming they're getting longnecks?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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It's in a keg or a barrel, and is therefore non-count beer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kate_Holloway

but how do you know that?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexanderT664830

I was asked to translate 'the farmer' earlier, and the only realistic option was 'el campesino', which i didn't know but made some sense because of the Latin root of camp- meaning field ... then here it asks me for 'the peasants', so obviously i'm not going to put the word i just learned for farmer! For now I'll forget campesino and use granjero (I'll be with farmers in S.Am soon) - I'd rather not say anything at all than risk calling someone a peasant! Sort it out Duo!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klpetrak

"campesinos" appear to mean both farmers and peasants. How do you in Spanish distinguish between the two clearly different populations?

3 years ago