"Hubo lluvia."

Translation:There was rain.

May 30, 2013

109 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TravisH44

Why do I use "Hubo" here and not "Había"?

May 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/todofixthis
  • hubo lluvia ≅ It rained (single event, definite ending).
  • había lluvia ≅ It used to rain (habitual/periodic, uncertain ending).

I think había lluvia could work, actually.

June 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wigglypeaches

That was my understanding as well - but then you see "ayer había una mujer aqui" or "había dos coches in la calle". The first even has a difinitive ending - it occurred yesterday. Can you help me understand this?

February 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/espanola_amanda

"Había" is more commonly used due to the meaning it conveys. When you are telling a story in the past tense in Spanish, any background, setting-the-scene type information is always in the imperfect. The proverbial "It was a dark and stormy night", "It was raining", "It was freezing cold", "The house was quiet" - all of these would be conjugated in the imperfect in Spanish. Even if you say when they occurred, because it's description that sets the scene, it's imperfect. Then, when you begin to tell the action of the story ("the robber crept toward the house and entered through a window"), you use the preterit. In this case, though, with "hubo lluvia", it's focused on a specific point in time in the past when there was rain. It's unusual, because rain is typically a background event in a story. I hope that helps a little!

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

An example helps more than a little. So many get told to translate the imperfect with "used to" - and sometimes you do. Sometimes you translate it with the simple past.

October 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chistesen

Definitely. Although some exercises here translate the imperfect as 'used to ...', IRL we would just use past tense in English because English doesn't have that difference in past tenses.

November 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConODonovan

Amazing!!

January 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

¡Bravo! ¡Premio de tres lingots!

June 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maryzita1

V helpful

November 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myrrha01

Here's a free online "preterite vs imperfect" test in Spanish with great explanationshttps://www.spanishdict.com/quizzes/64/preterite-vs-imperfect-in-spanish

November 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

To keep it simple. The "yesterday" means it is over and done. Things that are complete (over, done) use the preterite (simple past). "Ayer" is a "trigger" for (indicator of) the preterite.

"Hubo" is the preterite and is the correct word.

More information, beyond the simple:

The imperfect (había) typically has "triggers". These are phrases such as "siempre,, casi siempre, normalmente, a menudo, a veces, etc."

Did Duo actually have "Ayer había dos coches"? The imperfect doesn't really make sense, as "espanola_Amanda explained.

Note that some sources, including DUO, call the "imperfect" the "past-imperfect" (pretérito imperfect).

Also, the "imperfect" in English is also called the "past progressive" or the "past continuous.)

References: HTTP://STUDYSPANISH.COM/GRAMMAR/LESSONS/PRETIMP2 This gives triggers for both the imperfect and the simple past (preterite).

http://www.spanishdict.com/guide/spanish-imperfect-tense-forms http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/59 HTTP://STUDYSPANISH.COM/GRAMMAR/LESSONS/IMP3

https://www.myenglishteacher.eu/blog/imperfect-tense/ http://josecarilloforum.com/forum/index.php?topic=6942.0

This statement from farther down is also very good:

Lionheart_v7

"I am from Spain. "Hubo lluvia" is used when the rain started but it stopped. Examples: "El mes pasado hubo lluvia en toda la ciudad".

"Había lluvia" is used when the rain started and you don't know if it keeps raining or it stopped.

January 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Although some of the things you mentioned can be indicators, había and hubo do not use the quite the same rules to distinguish between the imperfect and the preterite as most verbs do. Había is actually sort of the default past tense for haber, both for the perfect tenses and for the past tense of the expression hay. I had worked out my own version of an explanation myself, but when I saw this video it all sort of fell in place.

https://youtu.be/tsCcG7L296M

Here is an English grammar site which discusses pretty much the same concept.

http://preguntolandia.blogspot.com/2010/05/hubo-vs-habia.html?m=1

Of course both of those are only discussing había vs hubo in terms of hay, not in the perfect tenses.

By the way the Study Spanish link is broken in your post.

January 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

But había is more common, and hispanics speaking English will sometimes even say "there was being a spider in the garage yesterday". Hubo lluvia makes it sound like it wasn't much and the sun's out now.

February 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

So they don't realize that we would place that differently such as "There was a spider existing in the garage yesterday.", but we would be more likely to say "There was a spider hanging around in the garage yesterday." We also say "There was a hammer lying on the workbench." or "There was a can of paint sitting on the shelf." Rather than saying "being" or "existing", we say "lying, sitting or standing" even for things. "There was a ladder standing in the corner." (It is fun that they do that in Dutch too and it seemed so familiar to me.)

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

Where exactly are you from, if you mind me asking? Since it seems quite odd (though understandable) to me to say that "lying, sitting or standing" for things, but they do the same in Russian (literally the exact same three verbs! ) and I remember that class well since my Russian teacher made a big point of how English people have a lot of trouble with it.

I've never studied Dutch, so that's interesting too. Obviously it's not simply a Slavic thing.

September 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

There is a lot of discussion about the difference between había and hubo, but this video explains it better than anything else I have seen or heard.

https://youtu.be/tsCcG7L296M

Essentially it says that había is more common and talks about normal events in the past. But hubo makes those things unusual or extraordinary.

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

Very helpful.

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myrrha01

If you want to check if you got it here's a great online test https://www.spanishdict.com/quizzes/64/preterite-vs-imperfect-in-spanish

November 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardSmi760243

Terrific video. I subscribed.

February 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chericher

Thank you so very much... have a lingot on me! This helped a lot, and I have subscribed to the channel.

February 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madix99

great video - thanks for sharing!

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

There are two ways to look at yesterday. Something happened and ended yesterday or during yesterday something was happening. Perhaps you should refresh your understanding of the imperfect. http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/haber_intro.htm http://spanish.about.com/od/verbtenses/a/two_past_tenses.htm

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fluent2B

I will take a stab at this because I think it's finally clear to me, although I must defer to anybody more knowledgeable.

Remember, it's not the past or present perfect unless haber is followed by the verb's participle. The participle for the verb llover (to rain) is llovido. Haber is also used to indicate past, present, or future existence. A few examples:

Using the verb, llover, along with haber, in the past and present perfect:

"It had rained all day" = "Había llovido todo el día"

"It has rained all day" = "Ha llovido todo el día"

Expressing existence using the noun, lluvia (rain), along with haber:

"There was rain today" = "Hubo lluvia hoy"

"There is rain today" = "Hay lluvia hoy"

"There will be rain today" = "Habrá lluvia hoy"

September 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chuzen

what about "it was raining"

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fluent2B

Estaba lloviendo = It was raining

Or: Estuvo lloviendo = It was raining

Whether to use the imperfect or the preterite tense of estar depends on the context: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=517411

November 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vicki.kura

How about "it had rained"?

August 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ROFLChief

How about that dog looks freaking awesome?

June 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vicki.kura

Thank you. :)

June 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeannineRN

Fluent2B, the problem is my verb books say "hay" and "haber" and separate and distinct verbs. "Haber" is an auxiliary verb, meaning "to have" (unlike "tener" "to have"). "Hay" means "there is, there are" and only has eight forms: hay, habrá, había, haya, habría, hubo, habido and habiendo. which all agree with the third person singular of "haber", except the present tense (so as to avoid any confusion, lololol). 9/2014

September 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Your book may have a point that the uses are so different that we may as well look at them as different verbs, but what is the infinitive of "Hay" since that is the present tense. It is just another way of looking at it to help people distinguish the uses. http://spanish.about.com/cs/verbs/a/haber_as_there.htm http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/haber_intro.htm

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GordonRobb

Any chance of a quick out line of what each of these 8 forms mean? Say in front of lluvia?

August 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

Three people downvoted your question, and that is a shame because Duomail answers that the answer is "there be." In other words, the simple present and past tenses of "haber" are used to mean "there is" and "there was," which are terms used to describe "existing" and "being," and the present perfect and past perfect tenses of "haber" are auxiliary verbs when they are placed with Spanish participles. Quite simply, depending on whether haber is conjugated in present or past tense or is conjugated as an auxiliary verb for the perfect tenses, the verb "haber" is unique because it changes meaning. To answer your second question, check out Fluent2B's examples above. There are also some websites listed on this page that describe how haber's meaning changes when the tense changes.

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BuceriasBecky

Thank you! That explains a lot!!

June 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MJMGruver

Thank you! Here's a lingot!

July 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GordonRobb

Your example is great, but It still doesn't explain the difference between habia lluvia and hubo lluvia. Any advice?

August 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joeyanderson493

From my spanish learning (I am learning spanish) "hubo" is to refer to a past weather event. "Hubo lluvia, ayer". It rained yesterday. On the other hand, I believe HABIA would be used more as describing the day. For example, someone asks, "how was the weather yesterday" "Habia mucha lluvia" However, if someone asks "Did it rain yesterday?" "Si', hubo lluvia"

November 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lionheart_v7

I am from Spain. "Hubo lluvia" is used when the rain started but it stopped. Examples: "El mes pasado hubo lluvia en toda la ciudad". "Había lluvia" is used when the rain started and you don't know if it keeps or it stopped. Example: "Hace una hora, había lluvia cuando miré por la ventana" This expression isn't common. We say "llovía or estaba lloviendo cuando miré por la ventana" Sorry for my English.

December 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

Gracias por la explicación bastante informativa. Ud. debe sentirse orgullo por su inglés. Cuando hablo español, puedo oír mis propios errores :-{ (Y también su número en inglés es más que el número en español. Qué raro.)

December 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George762866

You can also use it.

Había lluvia, hubo lluvia.

They are the same thing, it was raining in some place you were or it was raining in a punctual moment. Even "it rained" could be used here, because its meaning would be "llovió". The last one is not exactly the same but you would be understood. Sorry for my English, I am a native Spanish speaker doing the inverse tree.

June 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

Su inglés es perfecto. Necesitamos hablantes nativos. Muchos matices no están el los libros. Gracias!

June 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sweetbluesky

Try this: use the preterite for when something occurred and imperfect for when something existed. I think this verb is like querer, saber, etc. that change meaning in the preterite.

January 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandoVz228269

I'm a Spanish speaker and I don't really know how to explain "había" and "hubo" but I think we use them as you use "may" and might ". Well not all ways hahaha. It is a past continuous I think. If you say - había una cerveza aquí - it's correct, and also if you say - hubo una cerveza aquí -. But if you are talking at the same time and you're surprised and also ask for it, you cannot use "hubo"... What I mean is the next.

  • ¡Había una cerveza aquí! ¿Dónde está?
  • There was a beer here! Where is it?

That's correct to say, but if you say "¡Hubo una cerveza aquí! ¿Dónde está?", it's wrong to say or if it is right I'VE NEVER HEARD THAT Jajaja.

December 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandoVz228269

I'm a Spanish speaker and I don't really know how to explain "había" and "hubo" but I think we use them as you use "may" and might ". Well not all ways hahaha. It is a past continuous I think. If you say - había una cerveza aquí - it's correct, and also if you say - hubo una cerveza aquí -. But if you are talking at the same time and you're surprised and also ask for it, you cannot use "hubo"... What I mean is the next.

  • ¡Había una cerveza aquí! ¿Dónde está?
  • There was a beer here! Where is it?

That's correct to say, but if you say "¡Hubo una cerveza aquí! ¿Dónde está?", it's wrong to say or if it is right I'VE NEVER HEARD THAT Jajaja.

December 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anomalousjack

There is no timeframe mentioned here (last week, yesterday etc) so 'había' seems a reasonable choice - perhaps even preferable!

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

With or without a time-frame reference, había is the more common choice. But, although the preterite in general talks about actions in the past with a set start and end time, you never have to mention a time frame in the sentence to make it correct. In this case we can assume that the speaker was most probably discussing SOME one time. The context is missing here, but would not be for any actual conversation. But haber is one of those verbs which is more comfortable in the imperfect. Both as the auxiliary verb for the past perfect and when used to mean there was the imperfect is much more common. This video shows the significance of changing from habia to hubo when talking about the same event.

https://youtu.be/tsCcG7L296M

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

Good explanation in easy Spanish with English in the subtitles for the more difficult parts. Thanks!

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

That is part of a whole series of easy Spanish videos ¡Practiquemos!. They are in easy Spanish aided by the host's multiple personalities. It can be a little like Mr Roger's neighborhood, but being able to get the whole message in Spanish is wonderful. There even is a video about the Spanish r and rr sounds that has me pronouncing them decently, although I need a regular "fix" as the effects seem to wear off with time lol.

January 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pingu66

My wife is a native Spanish speaker and she says no one says "Hubo lluvia". It would be more natural to just say "Llovió"

August 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Algor17

I wouldn't expect someone to say this but I would expect to see it in literature to add variation in syntax structure.

August 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duonks
  • 1967

Hubo lluvia, hay lluvia and habrá lluvia are perfectly normal expressions in Spanish. I reckon I hear them every day on the weather forecasts for example :-)

They're pretty much interchangeable with llovió, llueve and lloverá... maybe I'd use haber lluvia if I wanted to bring the focus more on the rain itself rather than on the action of raining, but I'm afraid I can't really explain it.

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

Gracias por eso.

December 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Did you ask about "Había lluvia."? I have heard it is more common than "Hubo lluvia.", but I am assuming that they are just showing us all the forms. I think you could just say "It rained." as a statement (not as a translation here), but there are times when someone would deny there was any rain that you might say "There was rain."

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duonks
  • 1967

Había lluvia would be similar to llovía. Hubo lluvia would be similar to llovió.

There was rain vs it was raining. There was rain vs it rained.

Just for fun: había habido lluvia = there had been rain. Había llovido = it had rained. Había estado lloviendo = it had been raining. :-)

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanKnows

What's wrong with "It had rained"?

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duomail

That's a different sentence: Había llovido.

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ROFLChief

Ryan Reynolds, you sexy beast, is that you?

June 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/divaluisa

the pronunciation in this exercise is very difficult. It is not the Spanish I learned in school. LLuvia - giuvia?? "hubo" huvo Where is this pronunciation used? Not in Cuba (I had a Cuban teacher) Maybe Colombia? Can someone help?

May 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

Vs are made between the lips like Bs. In Peru, they're very distinct. In parts of Puerto Rico, they sound very much the same. In Mexico, interchanging Vs and Bs is a common misspelling. Most of the sounds - L, N, R, S, D, RR - are made with the tip of the tongue on or very near the upper front teeth. A Spanish NO and an English NO sound really different. Y and LL are near the front also. In Argentina, they can sound like the ZH sound in French. In Spain, they sound more like an English Y. In other parts of the New World, they sound like an English J. So yeah, the question sounds like "OOboe JUbia" to an English ear, but that's the way it's supposed to sound.

May 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patschge

why is "it has rained" wrong?

August 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

It didn't match what the program was expecting, but it could be right in some contexts. An example of one where it would not work is "There was rain in the area the last time I checked - i.e. maybe there still is." (La última vez que me fijé hubo lluvia en el área.)

August 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patschge

many thanks for your explanation!

August 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carmina_banana

Uff... hubo lluvia. I'm like this O_O right now thinking about when I use it... Ok. If it's useful for Spanish language learners from a native Spanish speaker from Spain, if yesterday there was rain, I would say ayer llovió. If yesterday there was rain (on the idea of "it was raining continuously"), I would say ayer llovía (cuando llegaba a casa) or ayer estaba lloviendo (por lo que no salí de casa) or ayer estuvo lloviendo (todo el día). When would I say hubo lluvia? To answer a question like ¿qué tal tiempo hizo allí/durante tu viaje/ayer/en el pueblo? It was raining, so I can say hubo lluvia. I would, but I usually say, just, llovía or llovió or estuvo lloviendo. The same applies for the present or the future: rather than habrá lluvia I say lloverá or va a llover.

People (in Spain) will understand you, but it's not the commonest expression in daily life. On the contrary, it is normal to hear in the forecast habrá chubascos moderados = there will be moderate showers or habrá lluvias fuertes en el área del Mediterráneo = there will be heavy rain in the Mediterranean area.

December 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/milrecan

Why use any form of haber? Why not just use the verb llover in the past tense

June 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Well there is a difference, as opposed to "a difference is", using "haber" this way to mean "there is" or in this case "there was" points to the existence of rain. Perhaps someone has just denied the possibility of there having been any rain yesterday at all.
"Why the ground is as dry as a bone! There has been no rain for ages." They are using the noun "rain". Sure you could say "It did rain.", but they don't have that helping verb in Spanish so it is only "It rained." which just doesn't counter the "no rain" statement as well as "There was rain."

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

Only because the author of the question chose to use it as a noun as in "There was still a little rain left on the table" and probably only put it as a noun in accepted answers.

June 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeannineRN

Is this an idiom? I put "it had rained" thinking it was the preterit of haber. Marked wrong 201508

August 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

Había llovido = it had rained. Hubo is there was or there were. They both look like haber, but I guess they're of different derivations. He aquí = here is is a third similar thing.

August 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeannineRN

Eeek, thanks, gernt

August 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

Eek! = ¡Ih! o ¡Ah! ;-)

August 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

This is an excellent website that sheds new light on "haber." Whoever gave you a "-1" was mistaken.

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joel856664

??????? Hubo= there was Then, translates- "it rained". No wonder people abandon foreign language learning.

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kitcatmnm

Lluvia is a noun meaning rain?

April 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

"Llover" is the infinitive of the verb that means "to rain." "Lluvia" is the noun that is derived by adding the article "la" before the third person singular form of the verb.

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kitcatmnm

Anyone have to pronounce this one and be forced to pronounce the hard h? Hoobo vs ubo.

April 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muyil

So recently 'll' was pronounced as 'g or j' and now 'll' is pronounced as 'y'. Are they trying to confuse us?

August 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

For Spanish, the tip of your tongue should be near or on your upper front teeth. In the right position, that Y can change to an English J sound depending on the force given it. So on TV, when they scream LLAMENOS YA!!! It sounds like jamenos ja. But if your tongue is further back (and it is), all those sounds - especially L, N, D, R, RR, & T sound gringo. I like the word "cathedral". If an English speaker carefully pronounces "catedral" keeping the tongue on their teeth, that R will roll, possibly for the first time in their life. And the English word is a great exercise for speakers of Spanish.

August 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

You must get used to this if you want to travel to different Spanish countries and speak to people. They have different accents. In the same way that I struggle to understand people from the North of England, or Cork Ireland difficult to understand, I have to learn their accent.

"ll" is pronounced like a soft "j", or "zh" in Argentina, so "Ella se llama Charlotte" becomes "É-zha se zha-ma Shar-lot". It's similar to the first consonant in "Doctor Zhivago".

September 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muyil

Previous lesson 'll' was pronounced as 'g or j sound. Immediate next lesson, it is pronounced as 'll'. Is there any explanation other than to be confusing to us?

August 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muyil

I hear 'Hugo' not 'Hubo'

October 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheryl-915-roche

we don't say there was rain very often in english. we say it rained!! the translation into english of hubo lluvia is definitely it rained

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Odinson33

Man the way she says ''Hubo'' is so fast and not clear.

November 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlbertLegalToll

Completely unintelligible first word! Movo? Mugo? Ugo? Horrible slurred word.

January 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwillanski

Is hubo pronounced hubo, huvo, or some other way?

March 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jumcbee

Seens like she mispronounced the sentence

March 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kg_409

The accent is saying rain wrong because ll is pronunced like a j was there

July 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1593

Um, that's a native speaker. Anyway, it's normal. The TV ads often say "Llamenos ya" in a way that to us sounds like "jamenos ja". And we say "Howdja like that?", "Can'tja see?", "I just wantja to smile a little". I'm currently teaching a Mexican student how to understand the news on TV. She can read and write English just fine. But understanding how it's pronounced in the real world is a different matter, dontcha think?. Duo is giving real examples of New World accents.

July 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil549414

Two questions left. Get both right and both are marked wrong

July 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraShi8

I wrote the correct answer but it was not accepted (Hubo lluvia:There was rain)

July 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NinosHeroes

I just read the examples below and I am still not clear. I think that in the exercises it should be stressed that there could be more than one answer. for example Hubo lluvia and Habia lluvia are both correct. Is this wrong?

August 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Both mean There was rain, so here both are correct. But there is a difference between them in weight or significance. This video is the best explanation I have seen of this. Additionally it is in clear, simple Spanish with subtitles with some vocabulary included. I recommend the whole series.

https://youtu.be/tsCcG7L296M

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieHunt18

It should be había!!

September 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Not necessarily. Había is certainly more of the "normal" way to say there was, but hubo can be used to make it more the central theme of the discussion. This video explains it better than I can.

https://youtu.be/tsCcG7L296M

September 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charles218008

audio mucho mal

September 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Debería decir muy mal.

September 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris.s4

Hubo lluvia There was rain

it rained llovió

y eso que soy nativo. _.

September 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/plmthaok

I really do not like the male voice, it is very difficult to understand at times.

October 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I definitely agreed when it was first introduced. But over time I have begun to understand it better. It does help to be exposed to different accents. Spanish is spoken so quickly by most native speakers and with so many different accents that most people find themselves unable to navigate a real world Spanish speaking environment even after learning a lot of Spanish.

October 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gary878157

The female speaker pronounces lluvia as juvia. The male speaker pronounces it as yuvia. Can it be pronounced either way?

November 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Yes There are probably more people who use at least a little of a j sound than the pure y sound, especially when the ll comes at the beginning of the word. It is quite a soft j sound with no explosive release, so don't overdo it.

November 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandoVz228269

I'm a Spanish speaker and I don't really know how to explain "había" and "hubo" but I think we use them as you use "may" and might ". Well not all ways hahaha. It is a past continuous I think. If you say - había una cerveza aquí - it's correct, and also if you say - hubo una cerveza aquí -. But if you are talking at the same time and you're surprised and also ask for it, you cannot use "hubo"... What I mean is the next.

  • ¡Había una cerveza aquí! ¿Dónde está?
  • There was a beer here! Where is it?

That's correct to say, but if you say "¡Hubo una cerveza aquí! ¿Dónde está?", it's wrong to say or if it is right I'VE NEVER HEARD THAT Jajaja I'm a 24.

December 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myrrha01

Probably the difference is in that when you say "Hubo una cerveza aqui" it implies that there was a beer here at one point in time in the past but you don't expect it to here anymore (real past) - whereas with "habia" there's this lingering feeling of a beer lying around here for a longer period of time and so you're just surprised that it's gone now.

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandoVz228269

I'm a Spanish speaker and I don't really know how to explain "había" and "hubo" but I think we use them as you use "may" and might ". Well not all ways hahaha. It is a past continuous I think. If you say - había una cerveza aquí - it's correct, and also if you say - hubo una cerveza aquí -. But if you are talking at the same time and you're surprised and also ask for it, you cannot use "hubo"... What I mean is the next.

  • ¡Había una cerveza aquí! ¿Dónde está?
  • There was a beer here! Where is it?

That's correct to say, but if you say "¡Hubo una cerveza aquí! ¿Dónde está?", it's wrong to say or if it is right I'VE NEVER HEARD THAT Jajaja.

December 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olgaz007

To me it sound like the new male voice pronounces lluvia with a soft L - not G, J or Y.

December 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouisMaxBl

Is this a Hispanuc expression and maybe less used in actual Spain? I noticed Duolingo uses very American Spanish. Living in Andalucía many phrases are so different.

January 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I don't know if this is particularly Latin American Spanish, but that is the Spanish that Duo advertises that they teach, just as they teach Brazilian Portuguese. My understanding is that Andalucia has a particularly distinct Spanish, though. Unfortunately I never have made it to Spain when I was in Europe. I actually don't think this is necessarily a common way of saying this though in Latin America.

January 31, 2018
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