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"Is bean dhifriúil í."

Translation:She is a different woman.

4 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FoxyAuroraBat

It's really nice to see how many people are running long streaks! :D Maybe I'll actually have people to speak Irish with. I heard somewhere that there are only about 90,000 fluent Irish speakers left in the world. That's probably not a relevant statistic, anymore, but there are over one million people learning Irish Gaelic on this site. Not all of them are sticking with it, but it's still spreading, and that means that bringing the Irish language back is actually within reach, all because of the internet, along with Paganism. Such deep culture coming back from a low-flying swoop. I love history. :) Now we just have to hope that it doesn't get corrupted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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The 'dh' is being mispronounced here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnikaFiercely
AnnikaFiercely
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Is it still incorrect? I know they changed the audio at some point...I'm hearing 'yifrul', but I have trouble distinguishing slender and broad 'dh' >:(

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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Yes, shouldn't it have more of a y sound when it comes before i and e, rather than the throaty sound that it has before a, o and u?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Yup. Those are indeed the slender and broad pronunciations of 'dh.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/obekim

Does this have the same ambiguity in Irish as in English? ie a) She is a physically separate person (from the one you were talking about etc); b) She is not the same as she was (she has changed emotionally, psychologically etc).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValaCZE
ValaCZE
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Why is here in "dhifriúil" used the lenition?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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It's because 'bean' is a feminine singular noun. That's one of the circumstances that triggers lenition.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValaCZE
ValaCZE
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ok thanks i guessed it, but why is lenied only "dhifriúil" and not bean?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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There's nothing to trigger the lenition on 'bean'. For 'bean' to be lenited, it'd have to be preceded by something which would trigger the lenition, such as 'an' (because 'bean' is a feminine singular noun) or 'mo' (because the possessive adjectives generally trigger lenition on the noun that follows them).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ValaCZE
ValaCZE
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Aha i see. In my language when adjective changes somehow the noun must change too. I thought that it happens in irish too. Anyway thanks for explanation

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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In Czech, you have syntactic agreement across genders and numbers. You have that in Irish, too (though less comprehensively than in Slavic languages), but lenition and eclipsis are something else: they occur only because of specific sequences of words.

This page give a good summary of how these changes came to be and the reason for their behaviour: http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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What is triggering the lenition in difriúil here, then?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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To repeat what I wrote earlier: "It's because 'bean' is a feminine singular noun. That's one of the circumstances that triggers lenition."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh.Hogan
Josh.Hogan
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I noticed that duolingo accepted "difriúil" when I translated from English to Irish on another question. Is that a dialectical thing?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

I see 4 exercises with "difriúil". The first two use predicative adjectives, and the second two use attributive adjectives. Only attributive adjectives agree with the number, case and gender of the noun, so the first two examples don't change because they are predicative, and the second two examples are attributive, but they are applied to singular masculine nominatve nouns, ("duine" and "rialtas"), so they don't need to change to agree with the nouns.

"Tá mo dheirfiúracha difriúil" - "My sisters are different"
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6843905

"Tá na dathanna difriúil" - "The colors are different"
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6385453

"D'oscail sé a intinn agus anois is duine difriúil é" - He opened his mind and now he is a different person"
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/11104259

"Bhuaigh na páirtithe nua agus anois tá rialtas difriúil againn" - "The new parties won and now we have a different government"
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/23488191

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

Two questions: 1. Can I use 'eagsúil' instead of 'difriúil' and 2. Doesn't the seimhiú in 'bean dhifriúil' break the DNTLS rule?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emile110
Emile110
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Please accept that, Pol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dzyanna1
Dzyanna1
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What about "the woman is different" as a translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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That would be the translation for either Is difriúil í an bhean! or Tá an bhean difriúil. Since the adjective is lenited in the original sentence, that means that it’s an attributive adjective rather than a predicative adjective.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leftmostcat
leftmostcat
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Why doesn't dental dots apply here? I would expect "difriúil" to be unlenited since "bean" ends in an n.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

The "dentals"-rule is not used with attributive adjectives (http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/adjekt3.htm#Lenition)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leah410066

That's what they all say...

1 year ago